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Posted 3/24/2020 1:55pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


TURNS OUT I HAVE AN EXTRA DIRT HOG.  FIRST COME FIRST GETS.


THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/22/2020 3:15pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • What a time to be alive.  Java Junction is closed.  Art Jr. is still roasting coffee and providing it to  GoGo Bean drive-in and thru facebook.  Robert, who runs La Sous Terre, is doing soup and sandwiches on a order out basis.  It's very important to shop local.  I doubt very much that the so called government bail-out will reach  to such very small businesses.
  • Robert  and Dallas, who helps me on the farm, told me that last week when they were at the local groceries, there was no ground beef and the meat cases only had a few packages of brats, no chicken. Yesterday Debra said there was ground beef.  If you can't find milk, contact Heritage dairy.  I'm sure they would appreciate your buying local.  I am sure a lot of this is because people are staying in and cooking for their entire family as schools are closed.
  • We have plenty of ground beef to process, just have to get to a level to commit an animal.  If you know of someone wanting ground beef have them send an email and I'll add their name to my list.  Those on the list may want to add an extra ten or so pounds.  This thing may last  into the summer.
  • We helped a friend with buying six dirt hogs this last week.  We had several names on the list and were happy to get them their request.  We had an extra half and normally I send out an email trying to get someone to take it.  Not this time, that half will be in my freezer.  We were almost out and the timing was perfect.
  • On hamburgers, we have discovered how best to cook a hamburger.  Try this next time.  We mix about a tablespoon of breadcrumbs in for each pattie.  This apparently absorbed some of the juices and makes for a very tasty burger.  They are cooked with a small amount of bacon drippings (crease).  Cook to just past medium rare.  Also, we have home made buns.  It may be time in this crisis to start  baking your own bread.  It is very easy.  A good book we used to start baking several years ago is, 

    The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking.  If you have questions, Debra can help, just send an email.

    • It's also time for all to consider making KOMBUCHA and KEFIR.  We all to increase our individual immune systems.  Washing hands, maintaining your distance are necessary, but there are things that we can do that improve your resistance.
    • Debra continues to plant, plant and transplant.  The green house is filling as are the raised beds.
    • On beef.  I had two calls this past weeks of people is search of freezer beef.  There was a hint of desperation in their questions.  They were interested in availability NOW.  I'm pretty sure they had not done much research on quality of grass finished beef. They wanted any kind of BEEF.  When I explained about not having any freezer beef until late April or mid May, depending on weather as they need 30-45 days of grass, they didn't seem to be interested.

 

 

*******************************************************************

Behold the fowls of the air…’   Alan Guebert         My father wasn’t stoic. Instead, his temperament was one of acceptance. He simply accepted the fact that he wasn’t in complete control of most things on the southern Illinois dairy farm of my youth.       Sure, he was boss over everything in sight: hundreds of acres, 100 dairy cows, five farmhand sons, three hired men, and his unpredictable, iron-bending Uncle Honey.       But control? Never. And yet, little ever moved him to anger or anxiety.       For example, when Jackie, the farm’s principal hired hand, destroyed an Oliver 77 by driving it off the corn silage pile, Dad’s only question to the still-shaking man—who was never known for speed—was how he managed to jump to safety so quickly.       Years later while sharing one of our thousand evenings in the milking parlor, I asked him why he hadn’t even cussed when he saw the mangled 77.       Ah, he said with a wave of a wet hand, once he saw Jackie was OK, the tractor didn’t matter. “It was old and insured. Jackie was neither.”       Acceptance. Somehow he just knew that there was little he could do to prevent bent cultivator bars (Uncle Honey), overturned silage wagons (Uncle Honey) and two, plowed-out telephone poles. (Uncle Honey and Uncle Honey.)       In fact, I once thought that if our family had a coat of arms, its motto would have read, “I can’t prevent it but I can fix it.”       Decades later, in one of our weekly telephone conversations, I asked my father how his best friend was dealing with a recent cancer diagnosis. “Not good,” Dad said. “He doesn’t want to see me.” Why?       “Well,” he said, “I think it’s because he hasn’t accepted the idea that dying is the cost of living.” Wow, what insight.       I asked him what he could do. Oh, he said, he’d find a reason to go to the friend’s house to talk about the weather or the Cardinals or the peach crop. Just chat, you know, about things that, when rolled together, make up today and tomorrow.       “I just want him to know that each day is a gift from God regardless if it brings a baptism or a funeral,” he announced.       That really was the essence of my father. Life ebbed and flowed and he rode it back and forth without fear or favor. He never asked for love or loyalty, he didn’t lighten his load by adding to anyone else’s, and he was religious but never preachy.       Two, almost opposite, traits might explain him better: he was a very good fisherman and he loved to play cards.       Fishing, he would say, is mostly preparation—the right bait, local knowledge, good tackle—and patience. Neither, however, ensures you’ll catch fish. That’s why “It’s called ‘fishing’ and not ‘catching,’” he’d say on the days we spent more time fishing more than catching.       Card playing, however, is mostly luck; you, literally, play the cards you’re dealt. Skill in playing them also matters but skill rarely trumps the luck of the draw.       My father embodied those near-opposites; he was prepared for whatever luck—fishing or catching—brought.       One last memory: I once asked him, a diligent Bible reader (King James Version, please) what his favorite passage was. After reciting his baptism, confirmation, and wedding verses, he settled on one that made perfect sense to him, Matthew 6, verse 26:       “Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they?”       Ye—we—are, my father might say, today and tomorrow and everyday. That said, I’m pretty sure he’d still keep one eye fixed on Uncle Honey.   © 2020 ag comm   The Farm and Food File is published weekly throughout the U.S. and Canada. Past columns, events and contact information are posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com.

Be sure to visit Alan's website for past articles.

**************************************************************

HOW ABOUT ONE FOR FUN??  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN-Csqdpji4

 

 





THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/22/2020 3:04pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • What a time to be alive.  Java Junction is closed.  Art Jr. is still roasting coffee and providing it to  GoGo Bean drive-in and thru facebook.  Robert, who runs La Sous Terre, is doing soup and sandwiches on an order out basis.  It's very important to shop local.  I doubt very much that the so called government bail-out will reach  to such very small businesses.
  • Robert and Dallas, who helps me on the farm, told me that last week when they were at the local groceries, there was no ground beef and the meat cases only had a few packages of brats, no chicken.   If you can't find milk, contact Heritage dairy north of Warrensburg.  I'm sure they would appreciate your buying local.  I am sure a lot of this is because people are staying in, and cooking for their entire family as schools are closed.
  • We have plenty of ground beef to process, just have to get to a level to commit an animal.  If you know of someone wanting ground beef have them send an email, and I'll add their name to my list.  Those on the list may want to add an extra ten or so pounds.  This thing may last into the summer.
  • We helped a friend by buying six dirt hogs this last week.  We had several names on the list and were happy to get them their request.  We had an extra half and normally I send out an email trying to get someone to take it.  Not this time, that half will be in my freezer.  We were almost out and the timing was perfect.
  • On hamburgers, we have discovered how best to cook a hamburger.  Try this next time.  We mix about a tablespoon of breadcrumbs in for each pattie.  This apparently absorbed some of the juices and makes for a very tasty burger.  They are cooked with a small amount of bacon drippings (oil).  Cook to just past medium rare.  Also, we have home made buns.  It may be time in this crisis to start  baking your own bread.  It is very easy.  A good book we used to start baking several years ago is, 

    The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking.  If you have questions, Debra can help, just send an email.

    • It's also time for all to consider making KOMBUCHA and KEFIR.  We all need to increase our individual immune systems.  Washing hands, maintaining your distance are necessary, but there are things that we can do that improve our resistance.
    • Debra continues to plant and transplant.  The green house is filling as are the raised beds.
    • On beef.  I had two calls this past weeks of people is search of freezer beef.  There was a hint of desperation in their questions.  They were interested in availability NOW.  I'm pretty sure they had not done much research on quality of grass finished beef. They wanted any kind of BEEF.  When I explained about not having any freezer beef until late April or mid May, depending on weather as they need 30-45 days of grass, they didn't seem to be interested.

*******************************************************************

Behold the fowls of the air…’   Alan Guebert         My father wasn’t stoic. Instead, his temperament was one of acceptance. He simply accepted the fact that he wasn’t in complete control of most things on the southern Illinois dairy farm of my youth.       Sure, he was boss over everything in sight: hundreds of acres, 100 dairy cows, five farmhand sons, three hired men, and his unpredictable, iron-bending Uncle Honey.       But control? Never. And yet, little ever moved him to anger or anxiety.       For example, when Jackie, the farm’s principal hired hand, destroyed an Oliver 77 by driving it off the corn silage pile, Dad’s only question to the still-shaking man—who was never known for speed—was how he managed to jump to safety so quickly.       Years later while sharing one of our thousand evenings in the milking parlor, I asked him why he hadn’t even cussed when he saw the mangled 77.       Ah, he said with a wave of a wet hand, once he saw Jackie was OK, the tractor didn’t matter. “It was old and insured. Jackie was neither.”       Acceptance. Somehow he just knew that there was little he could do to prevent bent cultivator bars (Uncle Honey), overturned silage wagons (Uncle Honey) and two, plowed-out telephone poles. (Uncle Honey and Uncle Honey.)       In fact, I once thought that if our family had a coat of arms, its motto would have read, “I can’t prevent it but I can fix it.”       Decades later, in one of our weekly telephone conversations, I asked my father how his best friend was dealing with a recent cancer diagnosis. “Not good,” Dad said. “He doesn’t want to see me.” Why?       “Well,” he said, “I think it’s because he hasn’t accepted the idea that dying is the cost of living.” Wow, what insight.       I asked him what he could do. Oh, he said, he’d find a reason to go to the friend’s house to talk about the weather or the Cardinals or the peach crop. Just chat, you know, about things that, when rolled together, make up today and tomorrow.       “I just want him to know that each day is a gift from God regardless if it brings a baptism or a funeral,” he announced.       That really was the essence of my father. Life ebbed and flowed and he rode it back and forth without fear or favor. He never asked for love or loyalty, he didn’t lighten his load by adding to anyone else’s, and he was religious but never preachy.       Two, almost opposite, traits might explain him better: he was a very good fisherman and he loved to play cards.       Fishing, he would say, is mostly preparation—the right bait, local knowledge, good tackle—and patience. Neither, however, ensures you’ll catch fish. That’s why “It’s called ‘fishing’ and not ‘catching,’” he’d say on the days we spent more time fishing more than catching.       Card playing, however, is mostly luck; you, literally, play the cards you’re dealt. Skill in playing them also matters but skill rarely trumps the luck of the draw.       My father embodied those near-opposites; he was prepared for whatever luck—fishing or catching—brought.       One last memory: I once asked him, a diligent Bible reader (King James Version, please) what his favorite passage was. After reciting his baptism, confirmation, and wedding verses, he settled on one that made perfect sense to him, Matthew 6, verse 26:       “Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they?”       Ye—we—are, my father might say, today and tomorrow and everyday. That said, I’m pretty sure he’d still keep one eye fixed on Uncle Honey.   © 2020 ag comm   The Farm and Food File is published weekly throughout the U.S. and Canada. Past columns, events and contact information are posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com.

Be sure to visit Alan's web site for more articles.

**************************************************************

HOW ABOUT ONE FOR FUN??  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN-Csqdpji4

 

 





THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/15/2020 9:39pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Martin houses are ready.  Now we have to keep sparrows out of the houses until the Purple Martins show up.
  • Cleaned and topped off the raised beds.  They're ready.  We found some carrots in them that overwintered perfectly.  May have to plant carrots in late Sep or Oct and have carrots during the winter.
  • Green house is great.  Have had plenty of greens all winter.  It's really simple, three cattle panels, some 2x4's and a plastic covering.  I have no plans, just come by and take a picture.
  • Iris and Mattie are due to calve in about two weeks.  We will be back in milk.  We have had to get our milk from Heritage Dairy, a small dairy just north of Warrensburg.  It will be good to have Guernsey A2 milk again, with a lot of cream on top.
  • Beef cows are due to start calving at the end of the month as well.  Hopefully, the rain will slow down.  That makes it so much easier.  I have everything ready to renovate the pastures.  
  • KC Food Circle is cancelled for this year.  The location, JCCC, has closed for all events due to the COVID-19 issue.
  • We have all of our fence issues corrected and now the voltage is near 7000 volts.  It was usually only 2-3000.  That should make finding faults much easier.
  • Remember, the riddle what is green that turns blue when it thunders?  I'm modifying it to:  what is green, then brown, and finally blue when it thunders?   We had just 2/3 inch of basically light rain this past week and PostOak our local creek that drains into Blackwater and then the Missouri river was 2/3 full.  It was brown, just from a light rain.  It doesn't look good for spring flooding from Nebraska to Missouri.  We drove that route, and it has been almost entirely corn and soybeans previously.  There is nothing to hold the water.  
  • I am including several items on viruses.  Our source for cod liver oil is greenpasture.org.  Our supply is low and I'll be placing an order tomorrow.

*************************************************

Dr. David Brownstein wrote a book entitled, Iodine, Why you need it, Why you can’t live without it.

Recently he blogged about how to keep yourself from getting the Corona Virus hereBE SURE TO CLICK THIS ONE.

An excerpt from the early part of that blog is as follows…

Wearing a mask will not help protect you from becoming ill with any viral infection—corona virus included. I would check that off the list.Corona Virus protection ??? IODINE !!!   LUGOLS IS A GOOD BRAND

 

**************************************

**********

 "Why You Can Not Kill   a Virus"  https://youtu.be/EADzWlbSdVM

***************************************************

"Exponential growth and epidemics"  https://youtu.be/Kas0tIxDvrg

***************************************************

Here is a very interesting article by Dr Mercola. Be sure to read it in its entirety. The interview is also very good. https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/02/23/carnivore-code.aspx?cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art1HL&cid=20200223Z1&et_cid=DM466555&et_rid=816375810







THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/1/2020 8:59pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • The green house is filling up.  Lots of lettuce, kale, spinach and young transplants.  
  • Pastures are very wet.  Hopefully, this week we'll miss a 10 % chance of rain and have an entire week of 60's and no rain.  
  • We have just about finished redoing ALL of our electric fencing.  Had to reset the posts deeper to accomodate a new mower that mows under the bottom wire.  That should eliminate having grass, weeds, etc drain and sometimes short out the fence. 
  • I have to get the martin houses ready this next weekend.  I think they may be earlier this spring.  Robins are already here.
  • ************************************************* 

 

Doesn't Add Up

red colored chickens in a wire cage on a factory farm or CAFO
 

The next time somebody tells you how industrial factory farming is a critical part of the economy—all those jobs, right?—you can point them to a new study that says otherwise.

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have determined that U.S. farms cost the economy more in health and environmental damage than they contribute to the economy.

According to an article in Forbes, the study focuses on particulate pollution, which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says is the cause of 90 percent of the 100,000 premature deaths attributed every year to air pollution.

Among industrial factory farms, poultry farms (like the one Costco is building in Nebraska) are the biggest offenders.

The study adds to the litany of reasons to end factory farming—and that’s without even including the health costs associated with eating factory farm meat, or the economic costs of other forms of pollution, such as greenhouse gas emissions and their impact on the climate.

Read ‘Animal Agriculture Costs More in Health Damage Than It Contributes to the Economy’


**********************************************************************

 

Bugged Meat?

pigs in a fenced farm pen
 

You probably don’t give antibiotics much thought—until you need them. But what happens if you need them, and they don’t work?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control says antibiotic-resistant bacteria and fungi cause more than 2.8 million infections and 35,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. On average, someone in the U.S. gets an antibiotic-resistant infection every 11 seconds. And every 15 minutes someone dies.

One of the big reasons infections have grown resistant to antibiotics? Industrial factory farms—which use nearly 12 million pounds of medically important antibiotics every year to stave off diseases caused by filthy, crowded conditions, and (though they don’t like to admit it), to make animals grow faster.

Interviews conducted by CBS 60 Minutes reveal just how far the industrial pork industry, dominated by a handful of multinational corporations, will go to keep researchers and safety inspectors from learning the full extent to which the industry is jeopardizing public health—all while pretending to protect farmers.

The segment also revealed how every package of pork brought into a consumer’s kitchen contains antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Dr. Lance Price, a microbiologist at George Washington University and a leading expert in drug-resistant bacteria, told 60 Minutes:

“. . . these bacteria, we consume them with the meat. Those bacteria then get into our system and they cause infections. Then, the infections, because they're already resistant to antibiotics, the doctors don't have any antibiotics to treat those infections.”

Sure, you may be able to cook the pathogens out of the pork, Price said. But:

“The problem is that when you bring that package into your house you're bringing a package, a raw package of meat. When you open that up, you have now just potentially released bacteria pathogens, potentially drug-resistant pathogens, into your kitchen.”

Don't want antibiotic-resistant bugs in your meat or kitchen? Stick with organic pasture-raised pork from farmers who produce meat responsibly.

Read and watch: ‘Is Overuse of Antibiotics on Farms Worsening the Spread of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria?’

TAKE ACTION: Tell Congress: Healthy Farm Animals Shouldn’t Get Antibiotics that Sick People Need



************************************************************************

Happened right up the road (Chillicothe) and mostly due to the lack of an effective government inspection system .

https://www.organicconsumers.org/news/missouri-charmer-led-double-life-masterminded-one-biggest-frauds-farm-history?utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagingnetworks&utm_campaign=OB+650&utm_content=OB+650



 

THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 2/24/2020 9:12pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • We went to the Midwest Farm Show on Sunday in Kansas City.  Very interesting very little for the small to medium guy.  The tractors and other things are HUGE.  I'm guessing if your interested you'll need an investment banker as a very close friend.  Of course, we taxpayers will help as the tax code will allow for HUGE depreciation.  I saw a report just recently that 40% of the AG income this past year was due to government payments. I guess that form of socialism is OK, just like the bailout of the banks after the housing market crash.  Back to the tractors.  I should have asked how big the fuel tank was, and how many gallons per hour are necessary under a full load.  Here's the challenge.  How will we be able to use a battery and a solar panel to propel this mammoth.  Oh yes, how many acres are needed to turn this thing around when pulling some HUGE tilling implement??
  • The series, What's Eating America, had its' second segment last night.  I tried to send this Update on Saturday, but something happened, and I finally got it resolved late today.  If you watched the first segment you found out who picks your strawberries and who picks your crabmeat.  The second segment last night dealt with the change in our climate and how that is affecting our food supply.  Next Sunday the segment will be on addiction.  First two have been very good.
  • It's time to prune your fruit trees and get your martin houses ready.   The scouts will be coming soon.
  • Debra has many seedlings up and growing.  Soon will be adding tomatoes, peppers, broccoli, cabbage and other vegetables.

Utterly Shameless

blue and white bottle of Monsantos glyphosate herbicide ROUNDUP on a store shelf
 

The Monsanto-Bayer Protection Agency is at it again. This time, your taxpayer-funded regulatory agency is teaming up with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to defend Roundup weedkiller.

The Wall Street Journal reported on December 20, 2019, that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “working with” the DOJ, filed court papers in support of Bayer’s attempt to reverse a California jury’s award of $25 million to cancer victim, Edwin Hardeman.

The EPA’s determination to protect Monsanto profits to the detriment of human and ecosystem health defies any reasonable explanation.

In fact, the more the evidence against glyphosate piles up, the more the EPA digs in its heels.

In December alone, GM Watch reported these new facts:

GMO-Based agriculture with its intensive use of pesticides has had a devastating impact on Argentina’s amphibian populations.

France’s national health agency, ANES, is so concerned about the health hazards of glyphosate, that the agency has withdrawn 36 glyphosate products.

And then this, the report that should be enough to ensure a worldwide ban on glyphosate: Glyphosate and Roundup are proven to disrupt the human gut microbiome.

When will Roundup and other poisons like it be banned for good?

When enough of us raise hell, and hold our politicians accountable—or vote them out.

Read: ‘Trump’s EPA Goes to Bat for Bayer as Company Fights $25-Million Verdict in Roundup Cancer Case’

TAKE ACTION: Tell Congress to Ban Monsanto’s Roundup Weedkiller



Raw Deal?

diary farmer hauling jugs of raw milk across a farm field with a dog and cow
 

How is it that poisons like glyphosate and chlorpyrifos can be sold—and sprayed on food—almost everywhere in the U.S., but 22 states prohibit sales of raw milk?

In fact, you almost need a law degree to figure out the jumbled mix of state laws governing raw milk sales.

Why do known carcinogens get a pass from U.S. regulatory agencies, but raw milk gets a raw deal?

Congress has never passed a ban on raw milk. Yet the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has used its regulatory authority to raid farms and prosecute farmers for distributing raw milk.

Some members of Congress want to stop the raids, and make it easier for consumers to buy—and farmers to sell—raw milk.

This week, Representatives Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) and Chellie Pingree (D-Maine) introduced the Interstate Milk Freedom Act (H.R. 5410), a bill that prohibits federal interference with the interstate traffic of unpasteurized milk and milk products that are packaged for direct human consumption.

Isn’t it time we stopped treating raw milk, widely recognized for its health benefits, as if it were more toxic than Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller?

Our Lisa is now dry waiting for her next calf due in late March.  We sure miss her heavy cream, A2  milk.  Luckily, we have a local small dairy that sells raw milk and that is sufficing for now.



THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 2/15/2020 8:30pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • We recently watched a program on PBS, The American Experience.  The title was The Truth Squad.  While watching, we wondered what has happened since Dr Wiley got the FDA created.  He was concerned about a few chemicals being added to our foods.  One was formaldehyde.  I was recently at Java Junction and a friend came in for his daily espresso.  He formerly worked at the Tyson plant in nearby Dresden.  He was a manager of one of their systems and went frequently to meetings at the headquarters in Arkansas.  He said he was in a meeting where the company listed on a power point a list of the top ten chemicals the company uses in processing chickens.  Guess what was number two, formaldehyde.  Where is Dr Wiley????
  • Oh yes, when I asked how you can make a BONELESS chicken wing, he first said you don't want to ever eat one.  After he described the process, I agreed.  Thankfully, I never have had one. Boneless chicken wings just didn't seem right.  The next time I'll ask about chicken patties.  How can they so uniform and just fit the bun?  I guess after that discussion, I'll regret having had a chicken patty in the past. By the way, chicken patties are every Wednesday entree on the local school menu.
  • Last year when he was still at Tyson they were doing 1.6 million and now they are doing 1.8 million.  I said "per month", and he replied "No, that's each week".  I failed to ask if the increase was due to the recent USDA relaxing the rule on chain speed.  I'll ask that next time.
  • Tomorrow night MSNBC will be starting a series on food.  Their past series have been very good, so I'll be watching closely, since I watch food production and food  manufacturing with great interest.  The title of the series is , What's Eating America, at 8 pm Sunday.
  • Eighty percent of grass finished beef in stores is imported.  Don't rely on the label. It is not a product of USA.  If the imported item goes through a US processing facility, it then become a "product of USA".
  • Last week we took our granddaughter to meet her father for her weekly switch over.  As we were standing there, we noticed a faint odor coming from the direction of the wind.  Olly said it's chicken.  Her father, our son Pete, who spent several years here at Breezy Hill, and being in FFA in high school recognized the smell immediately as a Hog CAFO somewhere up wind.  How many young people can distinguish a hog odor from chicken or cow, or horse??? A CAFO makes it a lot easier.  The soybeans in their ration causes the foul odor. 

***********************************************************************

New label will denote bioengineered ingredients. https://www.morningagclips.com/new-label-will-denote-bioengineered-ingredients/

 

******************************************************************

 

Ronnie Cummins, Organic Consumers Association 

 

When the ancient poet, Virgil, declared that “The greatest wealth is health,” he was likely referring to human health.

Virgil’s words are as true today as they were in ancient times . . . the difference is that today, our health is under attack from all directions.

Virgil couldn’t have foreseen today’s attacks on everything that makes human health possible.

Virgil didn’t anticipate a corporate takeover of food and farming, and the devastating impact that would have on the quality of our food and the health of our soil and water.

Yet nutritious food, fertile soil, and clean water form the very foundation of human health.

Ages ago, Virgil wouldn’t have had reason to predict a total collapse of our ecosystem. The insect apocalypse. The “Silent Spring.” The droughts, rising seas, and raging storms brought on by climate instability.

Nor would a poet living in ancient times have been familiar with the latest science confirming this: The health of the soil microbiome is directly linked to the health of the human gut microbiome . . . destroy one, and you destroy the other.

Today, you live with all of these threats. But perhaps the greatest threat to your health is the disintegration of our political process.

Unless we fix the system that lets corporations undermine the foundations of human and environmental health by rigging the political game, we’ll remain stuck in a perpetual game of catch-up.



Corporations use their billions in ill-gotten profits to influence regulators and policymakers.

The policies they promote are good for them . . . but bad for you, bad for family farmers, and bad for the environment.

The New York Times recently reported that 85 environmental regulations have been rolled back under the current administration. 

Those rollbacks include rules that give factory farms a pass on everything from animal welfare standards, to toxic substances and water pollution.

They also put independent organic farmers at a disadvantage in the marketplace.

Our consumer education and marketplace pressure campaigns, in concert with our legal work, expose the corrupt influence of Big Food and Big Ag on Congress.

These campaigns also help grow the market for healthy, organic food.

But the future of food also depends on good farming policies that support good farmers and ranchers and build the local infrastructure they need for long-term success.

People sometimes tell me there’s no point trying to reform the policies that allow corporate interests to threaten our health. The situation in Washington is hopeless.

I disagree. Just because we’re up against unprecedented corruption in Congress now, doesn’t mean we should sit back and wait.

Now is the time to lay the groundwork for a better, healthier future.

That’s why this year, in partnership with Regeneration International and the Sunrise Movement, we launched the 20,000-member strong coalition of U.S. Farmers & Ranchers for a Green New Deal.

When things turn around in Washington—and I believe they will—farmers must be ready to claim their rightful seats at the policymaking table.

This new farmer-led coalition is already hard at work, educating consumers, fellow farmers and ranchers, and state and federal lawmakers about what must be done to fix our food system.

The members of this coalition are knowledgeable, dedicated, and eager to get to work for all of us. We’re committed to supporting them. 

 

I'm with you Ronnie.  Keep up the good work.  It's a steep hill, and it seems like a slow climb, but we are making progress.






THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 2/2/2020 9:57pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • I think there's something going on that's out of whack.  We've had robins all winter.  There were two in the yard this morning.  They used to come in the Spring.  And our planting zone is now zone 6.  It used to be zone 5.  We may have palm trees soon.
  • Let's talk about connective tissue in meat.  A grass finished animal will by virtue of walking around to eat grass and walking to a water source have more connective tissue than a CAFO animal.  CAFO animals don't even have room to walk.  The pens are full, and they only have to eat, and water is close by.  I have considered tenderisers, but they were not of very good quality.  The meat industry got in trouble several years ago using the Jaccard method of tenderizing.  The e coli on the surface of the meat was forced into the interior, and if you wanted a medium rare steak, the e coli was not killed, and you went to the hospital. I have found a very high quality tenderizer.  We will be including it with our freezer beef customers, since cooking grass finished beef has to be cooked differently from the McBeef from a grocery store.  This will help with a more tender experience.

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While oolong is healthy, it is important to use loose tea leaves. Tea bags may be more convenient, but many are made with heat-resistant polypropylene to prevent the bag from breaking apart in hot water. This means minute pieces of plastic likely end up in your drink.

Paper tea bags are treated with epichlorohydrin, a chemical to prevent tears, which has been found to be a probable human carcinogen. Epichlorohydrin reacts with water to form 3-MCPD, another possible human carcinogen.

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On average, someone in the United States gets an antibiotic-resistant infection about every 10 seconds. About every 11 minutes, someone dies. That’s according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And as the Washington Post reported this week, those numbers confirm that deadly superbugs pose a worse threat than previously thought..



”the American Public Health Association (APHA) and the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) issued a joint statement calling for a “precautionary” moratorium on CAFOs, also known as factory farms.

The groups pointed to an “array of negative health impacts, including respiratory disease, mental health problems, and certain types of infections, and said that “government oversight and policies designed to safeguard the health of individuals and the environment from these operations have been inadequate."


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Fructose, the most damaging type of sugar to your body, is particularly hard on your liver, much like alcohol:

  • Fructose must be 100 percent broken down by your liver. Glucose on the other hand only needs to be partially broken down before it can be utilized.

    Corn sugars can damage your liver much like drinking alcohol

  • Fructose is metabolized directly into fat that gets stored in your liver and other internal organs and tissues as body fat, which leads to mitochondrial malfunction

  • Fructose produces toxic metabolites and superoxide free radicals when it is metabolized, that can lead to inflammation in your liver

Fructose is a cheap form of sugar that’s found in thousands of food products and drinks. It’s often deliberately disguised by the use of many different names, so the only way to steer clear of it completely is to avoid eating processed foods.”

*************************************************

How to End Mental Illness

BE sure to watch this. OR, if your busy doing something play it and listen to it. BLOOD FLOW! BLOOD FLOW!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ob5uJ9P6Ww&feature=youtu.be

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I'm introducing you to Robyn O'Brien. https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=ted+talk+robyn+o%27brien&&view=detail&mid=BE22509ACBB50AB9D9CBBE22509ACBB50AB9D9CB&&FORM=VRDGAR

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Vegetable Oils — A Hidden Cause of Cancer 

In a November 8, 2019, Medium article,3 Maria Cross, a nutritionist with a master of science degree, discusses the science behind vegetable oils and what makes them carcinogenic. She explains:

“There are two classes of PUFA: omega-6 and omega-3. Although functionally distinct and non-interchangeable, these two classes are perpetually engaged in a metabolic balancing act, pushing and pulling as they compete for absorption in the body.

There is nothing intrinsically wrong with omega-6 PUFAs: we need them … If omega-6 fat is essential to health, it makes no sense that it can also cause cancer …

That’s why scientists believe that it is not omega-6 per se that is to blame; it’s the balance between the two groups of PUFA that is out of kilter and wreaking havoc on our bodies. We evolved on, and are genetically adapted to, a diet that provides more or less equal amounts of omega-3 and omega-6 4 … 

With the industrialization of our diets, and the vast quantities of vegetable cooking oils that go into them, the ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 has shifted enormously and we consume up to 25 times 5 more omega-6 than omega-3 …

There can only be consequences, and indeed there are: experimental data 6 supports the theory that it is this skewed balance between the two PUFAs that influences the development of a tumor.”

https://www.organicconsumers.org/news/why-vegetable-oils-are-carcinogenic?utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagingnetworks&utm_campaign=OB+645&utm_content=OB+645

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Did you know!!!!!

https://youtu.be/okaQEAbviJk

 



THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 1/28/2020 4:28pm by Art Ozias.
            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • The ground beef pickup went great even though it was postponed due to weather.  Only three couldn't make it and were able to pick a couple days later.   We have another list already started.
  • We also had some freezer beef customers waiting on their deliveries.  Most customers have nearly always waited for me to deliver it to their freezer.  This time a new grass finished beef customer couldn't wait.  I had scheduled two deliveries in their area and was planning to deliver all three on one trip.  He decided to pick it this past Saturday.  I had emailed him to verify that he was picking up and to verify I didn't need to include them on my delivery.  Here is his email to me.  "
     Apologies for not letting you know sooner. We picked it up around 11 and left cash for you in the envelope. We had some burgers already and they were terrific! Thanks again! " 
     
  • Snow has made feeding hay a daily occurrence.  The cows sure are polite.  They wait patiently after I open the gate, and have a great time following as I unroll the 2000 pound bale of hay. 
  • The below freezing temperatures has frozen the ponds and our lake.  Before this latest cold snap we had hundreds of geese and even one day there was a lone pair of snow geese.  Past years we had thousands to snow geese.  Not sure what has happened to them.  Maybe a consequence of an outbreak of bird flu several years ago.   At the time, I had heard reports of government efforts taken in their breeding grounds in Canada to reduce their numbers.  Maybe it's true.

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The two great failures are CAFOS and hydros. CAFOs are Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, which is a long term for confinement factory farming for animals. These practices are prohibited in the organic standards, and yet they continue on a massive scale.

The other significant fraud is the certification of soilless hydroponic fruits and vegetables. Right now many berries and tomatoes sold as organic in America are actually grown in pots of coconut husks with fertilizers fed to the plants much like an IV tube. Again, this is prohibited in the original law that created the National Organic Program, and again, it is being ignored by the USDA.

 

https://www.organicconsumers.org/blog/may-fork-be-you?utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagingnetworks&utm_campaign=OB+643&utm_content=OB+643

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When you see a “Product of U.S.A.” label on a package of meat you should be able to assume that the meat you’re looking at came from an animal raised and processed here in the U.S.

But chances are, the meat or some portion of it was actually imported from another country.

The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Services Agency allows the use of the “Product of U.S.A.” label on any beef as long as the meat passed through a U.S.-based inspection plant, and/or was blended with meat from animals that were born and raised in the U.S.

This policy defrauds consumers who are committed to supporting local producers, and who assume the label means what it says.

The policy also hurts U.S. ranchers, especially those who produce grass-fed and grass-finished beef from cattle born, raised and processed in the U.S.

It’s time to close this labeling loophole.




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 1/19/2020 9:24pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Yesterday was to be a ground beef pickup day, but we cancelled due to the bad weather.  Luckily tomorrow is a holiday, and we will be able to get almost everybody here for the pickup.
  • This will be our first ground beef day for 2020.  For new people who have recently signed on, we have periodic ground beef days.  We maintain a list of customers wanting true grass finished beef.  As soon as we have enough requests to commit an animal, we schedule with the processor.  The ground beef is in one pound packages.  There is a ten pound minimum.  Some customers get as much as 50 pounds.  Many are repeat customers.  Sometimes we do roasts and briskets.    
  • We also maintain a list for Dirt Hogs.  These are hogs raised NOT on concrete, but on dirt, out of doors.  We do not raise them, but help out several producers in our area.  If they have extras, they call and I pair up either a half or a whole from my list.

 ***************************************************

  • A 2015 analysis supports the notion that animal fats are a healthy and important part of the human diet, ranking pork lard the eighth healthiest food out of 100

  • Pork fat’s nutritional fitness score was 0.73 — one of the highest scores within the “fat-rich” category. Only dried chia seeds (with a score of 0.85), dried pumpkin and squash seeds (0.84) and almonds (0.97) scored higher, and these seeds and nuts are all loaded with high levels of oxalates

  • Valuable nutrients found in lard are vitamin D, omega-3 fats, monounsaturated fats (the same fats found in avocados and olive oil), saturated fats and choline

  • When buying commercially-available lards, make sure they’re not hydrogenated. Most are, and hydrogenated lard will contain trans fat (although products containing 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving can claim to be trans fat free on the label)

  • Rendering your own lard is simple (albeit a bit time consuming). For the highest quality and nutrition, make sure the pork fat you buy is from organic pastured (free-range) hogs

 

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/11/04/lard-nutritional-benefits.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1HL&utm_campaign=20191104Z1&et_cid=DM383450&et_rid=742987782

When you get a Dirt Hog from one of my sources, be sure to get your tub of lard. Gilbert's add nothing. I'm not sure about Nadler's. ASK!

The following is what we use for cooking. How about you??

Aside from organic pastured pork lard, other healthy cooking fats include:

Coconut oil  It has a number of valuable health benefits, including a positive effect on your heart and antimicrobial properties. It’s also a great source of energy, thanks to its medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs).

When consumed, the MCFAs are digested and converted by your liver into energy that you can immediately use. Coconut oil also helps stimulate your metabolism to encourage a healthy weight profile.  We get ours from Green Pasutres by the gallon

Grass fed butter — Raw, organic butter made from healthy grass fed cows’ milk contains many valuable nutrients, including vitamins A, D, E and K2. It also contains minerals and antioxidants that support good health.

Organic ghee  Used for cooking for thousands of years, ghee is another good choice.  Also, from Green Pastures.

Olive oil  This oil contains the same kind of healthy fatty acids as lard that can help lower your risk of heart disease. While the standard recommendation has been to avoid using olive oil for cooking and to only use it cold, a 2018 study in which 10 popular cooking oils were compared, contradicts this advice, showing extra-virgin olive oil actually scored best for both oxidative stability and lack of harmful compounds produced when heated.

Basic foods like tomatoes, berries, apples, cauliflower and chicken are much less nutritious now than they were for our grandparents. They are significantly lower in basic nutrients and micronutrients, not to mention the 40,000 known secondary plant compounds that we are learning are so critical to our health.

 





THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com