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Posted 5/11/2020 11:18pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • We have a lot of cherries, apples, pears, and grapes.  We have dodged several low temperatures this Spring.   Lost a young peach tree for no apparent reason.
  • Remember some time back in Jan or Feb I included in an Update that we were having flocks of robins?  Well, we now have several nests of young robins.  Maybe they were just here early to find some nesting places.
  • Several of the tree grafts I did this Spring have taken.  I didn't hold much hope as the scions had , I thought, too much sap.  One never knows.  Just do it and more often than not, things work out.
  • Beef, Beef, Beef.  I have had so many requests for freezer beef in the last three weeks.  Many occurred after news of the many processing plants being forced to close.  The result is many potential new customers.  We are sold out presently and will not have more ready until later in the summer.   A person who lost out on the final split half on this next harvest said he decided to find a local source after having seen how the big processing corporations were treating their workers.  He said, " just put me on your list for the next available beef. I'm done with store meat".
  • I have been trying to keep up with all the requests for beef and pork.  I think I'm caught up.  If you have emailed me and not received a response, let me know.
  • The hamburger animals will be going to the processor tomorrow, so those on that list need to be watching for an email notifying them of when pickup will be.  There have been so many requests that I'm not sure the yield will be enough to satisfy all of the requests.

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Food Shortages? Local Farmers come to the Rescue.

While it took a pandemic to expose the underlying weaknesses in our globalized food system - it is propelling a much needed shift as Buyers seek to purchase food directly from local Farmers. Buyers are asking how to source from Farmers --- a question necessary for a shift in our food system. We are seeing Farmers experience unprecedented sales volume and customer growth! 

Welcome to the new normal. Americans are cautious about crowds, restaurants remain closed and buyers are actively searching for alternatives to the grocery store. The closure of processing plants is further shaking consumer confidence in the US agriculture system.

Local Farmers are the answer! Buyers are experiencing the face behind their food, and quality well beyond the commodity meat, dairy and produce sold at the grocery store. With many Farmers offering door-to-door delivery or grab and go meet-ups, they are locking in buyers with the convenience they have come to love and expect.


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HERE IS AN EXCELLENT PODCAST WITH DR MARK HYMAN. IT'S AN HOUR BUT TRULY WORTH HEARING.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r__rOU2G_P8

 




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 5/3/2020 9:22pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • You should see our strawberry plants.  We planted them last year and this year they are a picture.  We have different varieties, so some are in full bloom,many small berries and others are waiting their turn to bloom.  We try to spread them out  so we are not overwhelmed.
  • Asparagus is growing so fast.  One day they are just breaking ground and the next they are ready to cut.  Sure taste good.
  • The raised beds are now full.  Every inch is taken.  We are eating out of them, lettuces, radishes, spinach.  One bed is full of kale.  Another has cabbages and broccoli.  Who needs a produce aisle when you have your own garden produce?
  • The freezer that is over thirty years old that quit is now fixed.  Just needed a $25 part.  Thank goodness we still have a somewhat functioning repair economy.  It should be much more robust.  We throw away too many items that need a small part and someone trained in repair.  We used to get a toaster fixed.
  • Barn is full of barn swallows and boy can they fly and make a racket while near their nests.  
  • Martin gourds are full and other older houses are now being taken up.  I'll need to put up another martin "hotel" this fall.
  • Oh yes, we have a baltimore oriole feeding on oranges and singing on our east porch.  Beautiful bird and the sweetest song.  Hope they nest and raise a hatch.
  • We have guineas setting on three nests.  Often there are up to six adults covering all the eggs.  A real "it takes a village" moment.
  • Lola Jean has a new home so I am left with just Iris.  JUST Iris?  She is the best.  Does her thing outside and comes when called.  If too far away, I have a swiss cow bell and when I ring it she comes.  What a gal!
  • Now for the meat discussion.  I have had so many requests for meat, probably because of the covid plant closings.  I have decided to limit some of the requests so more people can get freezer beef and ground beef.  There will be more this fall, and if you requested a whole beef, I will get you a half on the next harvest, and add you back for the the other half when we have more ready later.  Any single request for more that fifty pounds of ground beef will be reduced to fifty pounds.  



THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 4/26/2020 10:46pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Iris had her calf, a heifer.  A few days later Lola Jean also had a heifer.   Now I'm milking two cows.  It's not too bad when everything works.  The cows have to get into a routine.  Who comes in first to get into the stantion, to stand and not be nervous, to remember how they behaved last time.  That first week is a challenge.  And then last night the milker wasn't maintaining its vacuum.  After thirty minutes trying to figure out why, I gave in and cancelled for the night.  I took the main component apart , replaced the internal parts and still it didn't work.  Finally, I noticed the pulsator was not fully engaged.   When it was properly installed it worked like normal.  I'll remember that for the future, but next time it will probably be something totally different.
  • I had someone request hamburger patties for the next order.  Here's the info.  The processor has a machine that makes them.  They can be 3 to 1, 4 to 1 or five to one pound.  They charge 75 cents per pound and a ten pound minimum.
  • I weighed the beeves today and as soon as I get a schedule date,  I will be notifying those on the list for freezer beef.
  • Those who recently got their Dirt Hog, including yours truly, are, I guess, feeling pretty fortunate, as the news keeps reporting of the large processors closing due to the virus. Its got to have an impact at the grocery store.
  • We have a nest of robins in our tulip tree and a nest of doves in our squeeze chute.  I had to be careful weighing the beeves today as the nest was between two pipes of the chute.  The babies had just recently hatched, so I don't think they were disturbed by the clanging and banging as the beeves moved in and out.
  • I potted ten white pines to be transplanted this fall.
  • It sure is nice to have the freezers full.  Watching the news about meat shortages, and no farm workers to harvest fruits and vegetables, is why many vegetable seed companies are running out of seeds.  Maybe people will learn to grow some of their own food.  I also read that hatcheries are way behind this year due to the increased demand for baby chicks.
  • We have four guinea hens setting.  Should have plenty of baby guineas (keets).  You need a lot.  The old owl will get some .

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Dr John Ikerd formerly at MU has a very recent  presentation I think you will find interesting and informative.  

https://youtu.be/3ggOX4VdvuY

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STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Tap water is often brimming with harmful pesticides, herbicides, pharmaceuticals, cyanobacteria, disinfection byproducts and fluoride

  • Cyanobacteria from algae can cause skin irritations, neurological symptoms and liver and kidney damage and are linked to diseases like Alzheimer's and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

  • The herbicide glyphosate worsens toxic algae because cyanobacteria use its phosphonates as fuel

  • Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and large-scale monocrop farms cause high levels of nitrates to be in drinking water

  • PFAS, found in a wide range of consumer products, are also in tap water and can accumulate and stay in the human body for long periods of time



https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/03/11/most-tap-water-toxic-soup-of-chemicals.aspx?cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art2HL&cid=20200311Z1&et_cid=DM478043&et_rid=827399684







THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 4/16/2020 9:25pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • We have a pair of Canadian geese on each of two of our ponds.  We've had that before, and it is sure neat to watch after they hatch out and swim, and then learn to fly.
  • Lola Jean, Iris and Mattie are still holding out.  Lola Jean sure looked like she was going to have hers on Sunday in that miserable cold rain, but she is still eating grass and getting wider and wider.  I had moved her back with the milk cows on Sunday.  She had been with the beef cows this past several months.  She was never quite accepted.  She grazed by herself, and never had any buddies.  Now she is back with her "kind", and is again enjoying her time.  It was nice for me to have her with the beef cows as she would come up to me and let me scratch her head.  I think it set a good example for the normally kind of skittish beef cows.
  • I had to pay an electric bill for the past three months.  That was a first for almost six years.  I just knew there had to be something a miss.  I contacted the installer of my solar panels, and sure enough a majority of the panels had black mold.  After cleaning with soap, a deck cleaner and a very long RV brush, they are clean, and I guess I now have an annual task in cleaning the solar panels.
  • We have two dog houses free to whomever.  Let me know.
  • We have a broken freezer that would make a great place to store chicken feed, horse feed or whatever safely from mice.  It's also free.  We had a ground beef pickup last week, and luckily we had to store some for a customer.  When I went to get it, I noticed some items in a basket were a little soft.  Sure enough the freezer is kaput, and can't be repaired.  It was at least 30 years old.  Guess what?  You can't buy a freezer at Lowe's, Home Depot, or Menards.  Nowhere.  I saw on the news tonight Whirlpool is closed due to the virus.  I didn't know people were buying up freezers; I knew about toilet paper.
  • I tagged the first batch of calves this afternoon.  I moved them and their moms out of the nursery and onto a fresh grass pasture.  Their moms paid no attention to the calves running around as they were gorging on GRASS.
  • With all the reports on meat processors closing due to the virus there just may be shortages showing up in your local grocery.  We will start our harvesting in about 30 days.  The grass is green and growing.  Luckily, it hasn't been too wet and the GRASS is good.

 

 That is a sweet potato and it is growing our slips for our garden.  Yes, you can grow your own.

 

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BLOG POSTS FROM TAILOR MADE CATTLE

 

First, it is important to maintain optimal levels of nutrients, particularly vitamins A, C, and D. Most people have suboptimal vitamin A and C levels. Both of these nutrients have antiviral abilities and are able to support the immune system when it is under viral attack. If you are not ill, I suggest taking 3-5,000 mg/day of vitamin C. At the first sign of an illness, I would suggest taking 1,000 mg/hour until diarrhea develops, then back off for a time period. For vitamin A, I suggest using 5,000 Units/day if you are not sick and 100,000 Units/day for four days at the first sign of an illness. Pregnant women cannot take these doses. (Note: Take vitamin A, not beta carotene.)  Also, vitamin D is very important for fighting infections.  I suggest, at the onset of an illness, taking 50,000 IU of vitamin D3/day for four days.

 

Iodine is essential to not only fighting off an infection it is necessary for proper immune system functioning. There is no bacteria, virus, parasite or fungus that is known to be resistant to iodine. As I have written in my book, Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It, most of the population is low in iodine. If fact, iodine levels have fallen nearly 60% over the last 40 years. The RDA for iodine is inadequate to supply enough iodine for all the bodily tissues. For the majority of my patients, I suggest taking 25 mg/day as a daily dose and more (sometimes 50-100 mg/day) at the first sign of an illness. Iodine can cause adverse effects and it is best used under the guidance of an iodine-knowledgeable doctor.

 

To prevent becoming ill and to avoid having a poorly responding immune system, it is vitally important to eat a healthy diet free of all sources of refined sugar. Refined sugar has been shown to negatively alter the functioning of the white blood cells for hours after ingestion. Finally, it is important to maintain optimal hydration—drink water! Take your body weight in pounds, divide by two and the resultant number is the amount of water to drink per day in ounces. Dehydration ensures you will be much more likely to suffer serious problems from any infectious process.”

Hope that eases your mind somewhat.

However, 1/1000 people can not handle Iodine … so start slow. AND THIS WAS FROM A CATTLE GUY!!

To see if your are deficient in Iodine cover a 2 inch square area on the underside of your wrist with tincture of iodine.  Time how long it takes for your skin to absorb it.  The more deficient you are the faster it will absorb.

Iodine patch test: The iodine patch test is a test where doctors paint a patch of iodine on your skin and check how it looks 24 hours later. For those who are not iodine deficient, the patch fades no sooner than 24 hours. But a deficiency will likely cause the iodine to be absorbed into the skin more quickly.

 

 




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 4/7/2020 9:44pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • It's easy to stay at home during the spring.  There is so much to do.  Gardens, pastures to renovate, cows calving, pruning trees, mowing the yard,  and all the other daily routine chores.
  • We have had four new calves.  The next week will be a bunch more.  I wish all could observe how the cow family functions.  Each day there is a different momma cow with nursery duty.  She stays with the babies while the other mothers graze.  There is no argument.  They just do it.
  • Martins are back and I'm still trying to stay ahead of the sparrows that try to move in the Martin houses.  I'm not sure how many times they can lay eggs.  When I clean the nests out usually there is four eggs.  Then in about two weeks, I do it again, and again four eggs.
  • We will be having a ground beef pickup this week.  Those not receiving an email have moved up on the list and the next date will be in mid May.  That was the earliest I could get.  There should be plenty for the next pickup, so if you want to add a little you can.  If you know someone trying to find grass finished beef, feel free to have them  email me.  Our price is the same as last year.  The price at the local grocery has increased about 10 percent.  It is now $6.19 per pound.  Meanwhile, prices at the local livestock auction have taken a bath recently.
  • We have marrow bones available.  They are $3/#.

 

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Here's your article to get your garden started.

https://lovelygreens.com/grow-a-rapid-response-victory-garden/

 

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Watch "Could This Practice Be Our Saving Grace?" https://youtu.be/MgiZwZbkzOs

 

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Watch "How Monocrops Are Killing Seafood"

https://youtu.be/-SqmrVWsOL8

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Here is an article from John Ikerd.

https://www.foodsystemsjournal.org/index.php/fsj/article/view/778/765

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This email was just received.  She was a very interesting young lady.  We had about a two hour visit and I was quite impressed with her knowledge of our food systems.

 

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/FMfcgxwHMjnQcpvDqbrgQdknBDLKQDNv


THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/30/2020 9:21pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Well, here we are in another unbelievable week, and it looks like several more are in our future.  We are busy into our spring projects.  That helps.  No time to be bored.  Replace half of our house's shingles.  Had to remove the skylights as we have fought leaks for the past couple of years.  We tried multiple attempts to stop them from leaking.  So, we have four, still intact, skylights that someone could easily convert to cold frames.  They are 27 by 42 inches.  They are free to whomever.  Now would be a great time for someone to convert them and get your garden started.
  • The purple martin scouts returned last week and now this week the masses are returning.  The first barn swallow was spotted yesterday.  The turkey buzzards are also soaring overhead looking to clean up whatever remains for their "golden corral".
  • We had an unfortunate situation this past week.  One our very best cows broke her hip and we had to put her down.   Probably a result of what cows do, head butting and pushing around to establish alpha A and such.  Normally, nothing much happens, but when footing is mostly mud it can happen.
  • Radishes and arugula have sprouted.  Our second raised bed is filling with future food.  This crisis may just be the right time for everyone to consider gardening for your food.  We have some potatoes ready to be planted.  We have been waiting for ground to dry sufficiently.  We have planted in prior years and then it got so wet they rotted in the ground.

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The Food Squad https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/poison-squad/

 

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Seven in 10 US shoppers buy organic poultry. Unfortunately, the birds consumers are most likely to find come from industrialized operations where they live in fixed housing with no meaningful outdoor access.

The Cornucopia Institute’s report, For the Birds: How to Recognize Authentic Organic Chicken and Turkey, uncovers critical issues in certified organic chicken and turkey production, including unsettling animal welfare and environmental concerns.

This research serves as a call to action. Our food dollars can safeguard ethical, organic poultry farmers and secure their essential role in the marketplace.

The accompanying Organic Poultry Scorecard surveys more than 60 marketplace brands of chicken and turkey, highlighting authentic organic producers and exposing industrial-scale, faux-organic producers and brands. This mobile-friendly rating tool points consumers to brands they can trust and warns of those to avoid.

Some of these problematic brands can be found on the Who Owns Organic Poultry? infographic, which reveals how some parent companies and suppliers of organic poultry brands provide consumers the illusion of choice. Perdue’s organic brands, identified here, dominate the organic poultry market with industrial-organic meat.

Contact Virginia at souscon4@gmail.com and get on her list for your chicken for this coming year.

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Podcast with Dr Bush. https://www.ecofarmingdaily.com/?s=bush



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CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO//February 15, 2020//In the wake of Friday’s $15 million verdict for compensatory damages, the same Missouri jury in the closely watched Monsanto/Bayer and BASF dicamba trial returned a $250 million punitive damages verdict on Saturday. U.S. farmers with crop, fruit, and other broad leaf plant damage caused by the herbicide manufactured by Monsanto/Bayer and BASF will finally be able to get the justice they deserve, according to Peiffer Wolf Carr & Kane (Peiffer Wolf) attorneys Paul Lesko and Joseph Peiffer. For more information, see https://dicambadrift.com/.

 

Peiffer Wolf attorney Paul Lesko said: “Farmers and landowners who have had crops damaged or destroyed by dicamba need to do one thing today: contact a lawyer to understand your rights to recover your losses.  Here at Peiffer Wolf, we have people standing by right now to answer the questions and concerns farmers may have about this $265 million award to a Missouri peach farmer.  Our advice is simple:  If you suffered damages from dicamba, the time to act is now.”

 

Peiffer Wolf managing partner Joseph Peiffer said: “The jury sent a clear message to Monsanto/Bayer and BASF that if you destroy a farmer’s livelihood, you will be held accountable.  On behalf of the farmers we currently represent and those who will seek out our help, we are encouraged by the fact that the jury recognized the lack of remorse of these companies.  This kind of outrageous conduct will only end when it is too expensive for Monsanto/Bayer and BASF to keep engaging in this bad behavior. Today’s verdict is just the beginning of our fight for justice against Monsanto/Bayer and BASF.”

 

Peiffer Wolf is fighting on behalf of farmers and landowners to seek maximum compensation for the damages suffered due to dicamba. If you suspect that your crops or plants have been damaged by dicamba, contact Peiffer Wolf by filling out an online contact form or by calling 314-833-4826.

 

In 2017, 3.6 million acres of soybeans on 2,708 farms nationwide were damaged by dicamba, according to the estimate of University of Missouri crop science professor Kevin Bradley. The Illinois Department of Agriculture found a five-fold increase in complaints — from less than 130 total complaints for all pesticides in 2016 to more than 700 for dicamba alone in 2019.

 

While local authorities have leveled some fines against farmers who misuse dicamba, most damage goes unreported. When violations are found, the typical response appears to be a warning letter. For those rare times when fines are assessed, it’s typically a $200 to $1,000 payment that goes directly to the state … not to the farmers who suffered damages. According to Modern Farmer, farmers impacted by dicamba will lose an estimated 10 to 30 percent of their annual crop yield. If farmers want justice, it looks like the court system is the only place to go.

 

Peiffer Wolf Carr & Kane, APLC is a national law firm with offices in Missouri, Cleveland, Austin, New York, New Orleans, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.  https://dicambadrift.com/

 





THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/24/2020 1:55pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


TURNS OUT I HAVE AN EXTRA DIRT HOG.  FIRST COME FIRST GETS.


THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/22/2020 3:15pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • What a time to be alive.  Java Junction is closed.  Art Jr. is still roasting coffee and providing it to  GoGo Bean drive-in and thru facebook.  Robert, who runs La Sous Terre, is doing soup and sandwiches on a order out basis.  It's very important to shop local.  I doubt very much that the so called government bail-out will reach  to such very small businesses.
  • Robert  and Dallas, who helps me on the farm, told me that last week when they were at the local groceries, there was no ground beef and the meat cases only had a few packages of brats, no chicken. Yesterday Debra said there was ground beef.  If you can't find milk, contact Heritage dairy.  I'm sure they would appreciate your buying local.  I am sure a lot of this is because people are staying in and cooking for their entire family as schools are closed.
  • We have plenty of ground beef to process, just have to get to a level to commit an animal.  If you know of someone wanting ground beef have them send an email and I'll add their name to my list.  Those on the list may want to add an extra ten or so pounds.  This thing may last  into the summer.
  • We helped a friend with buying six dirt hogs this last week.  We had several names on the list and were happy to get them their request.  We had an extra half and normally I send out an email trying to get someone to take it.  Not this time, that half will be in my freezer.  We were almost out and the timing was perfect.
  • On hamburgers, we have discovered how best to cook a hamburger.  Try this next time.  We mix about a tablespoon of breadcrumbs in for each pattie.  This apparently absorbed some of the juices and makes for a very tasty burger.  They are cooked with a small amount of bacon drippings (crease).  Cook to just past medium rare.  Also, we have home made buns.  It may be time in this crisis to start  baking your own bread.  It is very easy.  A good book we used to start baking several years ago is, 

    The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking.  If you have questions, Debra can help, just send an email.

    • It's also time for all to consider making KOMBUCHA and KEFIR.  We all to increase our individual immune systems.  Washing hands, maintaining your distance are necessary, but there are things that we can do that improve your resistance.
    • Debra continues to plant, plant and transplant.  The green house is filling as are the raised beds.
    • On beef.  I had two calls this past weeks of people is search of freezer beef.  There was a hint of desperation in their questions.  They were interested in availability NOW.  I'm pretty sure they had not done much research on quality of grass finished beef. They wanted any kind of BEEF.  When I explained about not having any freezer beef until late April or mid May, depending on weather as they need 30-45 days of grass, they didn't seem to be interested.

 

 

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Behold the fowls of the air…’   Alan Guebert         My father wasn’t stoic. Instead, his temperament was one of acceptance. He simply accepted the fact that he wasn’t in complete control of most things on the southern Illinois dairy farm of my youth.       Sure, he was boss over everything in sight: hundreds of acres, 100 dairy cows, five farmhand sons, three hired men, and his unpredictable, iron-bending Uncle Honey.       But control? Never. And yet, little ever moved him to anger or anxiety.       For example, when Jackie, the farm’s principal hired hand, destroyed an Oliver 77 by driving it off the corn silage pile, Dad’s only question to the still-shaking man—who was never known for speed—was how he managed to jump to safety so quickly.       Years later while sharing one of our thousand evenings in the milking parlor, I asked him why he hadn’t even cussed when he saw the mangled 77.       Ah, he said with a wave of a wet hand, once he saw Jackie was OK, the tractor didn’t matter. “It was old and insured. Jackie was neither.”       Acceptance. Somehow he just knew that there was little he could do to prevent bent cultivator bars (Uncle Honey), overturned silage wagons (Uncle Honey) and two, plowed-out telephone poles. (Uncle Honey and Uncle Honey.)       In fact, I once thought that if our family had a coat of arms, its motto would have read, “I can’t prevent it but I can fix it.”       Decades later, in one of our weekly telephone conversations, I asked my father how his best friend was dealing with a recent cancer diagnosis. “Not good,” Dad said. “He doesn’t want to see me.” Why?       “Well,” he said, “I think it’s because he hasn’t accepted the idea that dying is the cost of living.” Wow, what insight.       I asked him what he could do. Oh, he said, he’d find a reason to go to the friend’s house to talk about the weather or the Cardinals or the peach crop. Just chat, you know, about things that, when rolled together, make up today and tomorrow.       “I just want him to know that each day is a gift from God regardless if it brings a baptism or a funeral,” he announced.       That really was the essence of my father. Life ebbed and flowed and he rode it back and forth without fear or favor. He never asked for love or loyalty, he didn’t lighten his load by adding to anyone else’s, and he was religious but never preachy.       Two, almost opposite, traits might explain him better: he was a very good fisherman and he loved to play cards.       Fishing, he would say, is mostly preparation—the right bait, local knowledge, good tackle—and patience. Neither, however, ensures you’ll catch fish. That’s why “It’s called ‘fishing’ and not ‘catching,’” he’d say on the days we spent more time fishing more than catching.       Card playing, however, is mostly luck; you, literally, play the cards you’re dealt. Skill in playing them also matters but skill rarely trumps the luck of the draw.       My father embodied those near-opposites; he was prepared for whatever luck—fishing or catching—brought.       One last memory: I once asked him, a diligent Bible reader (King James Version, please) what his favorite passage was. After reciting his baptism, confirmation, and wedding verses, he settled on one that made perfect sense to him, Matthew 6, verse 26:       “Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they?”       Ye—we—are, my father might say, today and tomorrow and everyday. That said, I’m pretty sure he’d still keep one eye fixed on Uncle Honey.   © 2020 ag comm   The Farm and Food File is published weekly throughout the U.S. and Canada. Past columns, events and contact information are posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com.

Be sure to visit Alan's website for past articles.

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HOW ABOUT ONE FOR FUN??  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN-Csqdpji4

 

 





THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/22/2020 3:04pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • What a time to be alive.  Java Junction is closed.  Art Jr. is still roasting coffee and providing it to  GoGo Bean drive-in and thru facebook.  Robert, who runs La Sous Terre, is doing soup and sandwiches on an order out basis.  It's very important to shop local.  I doubt very much that the so called government bail-out will reach  to such very small businesses.
  • Robert and Dallas, who helps me on the farm, told me that last week when they were at the local groceries, there was no ground beef and the meat cases only had a few packages of brats, no chicken.   If you can't find milk, contact Heritage dairy north of Warrensburg.  I'm sure they would appreciate your buying local.  I am sure a lot of this is because people are staying in, and cooking for their entire family as schools are closed.
  • We have plenty of ground beef to process, just have to get to a level to commit an animal.  If you know of someone wanting ground beef have them send an email, and I'll add their name to my list.  Those on the list may want to add an extra ten or so pounds.  This thing may last into the summer.
  • We helped a friend by buying six dirt hogs this last week.  We had several names on the list and were happy to get them their request.  We had an extra half and normally I send out an email trying to get someone to take it.  Not this time, that half will be in my freezer.  We were almost out and the timing was perfect.
  • On hamburgers, we have discovered how best to cook a hamburger.  Try this next time.  We mix about a tablespoon of breadcrumbs in for each pattie.  This apparently absorbed some of the juices and makes for a very tasty burger.  They are cooked with a small amount of bacon drippings (oil).  Cook to just past medium rare.  Also, we have home made buns.  It may be time in this crisis to start  baking your own bread.  It is very easy.  A good book we used to start baking several years ago is, 

    The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking.  If you have questions, Debra can help, just send an email.

    • It's also time for all to consider making KOMBUCHA and KEFIR.  We all need to increase our individual immune systems.  Washing hands, maintaining your distance are necessary, but there are things that we can do that improve our resistance.
    • Debra continues to plant and transplant.  The green house is filling as are the raised beds.
    • On beef.  I had two calls this past weeks of people is search of freezer beef.  There was a hint of desperation in their questions.  They were interested in availability NOW.  I'm pretty sure they had not done much research on quality of grass finished beef. They wanted any kind of BEEF.  When I explained about not having any freezer beef until late April or mid May, depending on weather as they need 30-45 days of grass, they didn't seem to be interested.

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Behold the fowls of the air…’   Alan Guebert         My father wasn’t stoic. Instead, his temperament was one of acceptance. He simply accepted the fact that he wasn’t in complete control of most things on the southern Illinois dairy farm of my youth.       Sure, he was boss over everything in sight: hundreds of acres, 100 dairy cows, five farmhand sons, three hired men, and his unpredictable, iron-bending Uncle Honey.       But control? Never. And yet, little ever moved him to anger or anxiety.       For example, when Jackie, the farm’s principal hired hand, destroyed an Oliver 77 by driving it off the corn silage pile, Dad’s only question to the still-shaking man—who was never known for speed—was how he managed to jump to safety so quickly.       Years later while sharing one of our thousand evenings in the milking parlor, I asked him why he hadn’t even cussed when he saw the mangled 77.       Ah, he said with a wave of a wet hand, once he saw Jackie was OK, the tractor didn’t matter. “It was old and insured. Jackie was neither.”       Acceptance. Somehow he just knew that there was little he could do to prevent bent cultivator bars (Uncle Honey), overturned silage wagons (Uncle Honey) and two, plowed-out telephone poles. (Uncle Honey and Uncle Honey.)       In fact, I once thought that if our family had a coat of arms, its motto would have read, “I can’t prevent it but I can fix it.”       Decades later, in one of our weekly telephone conversations, I asked my father how his best friend was dealing with a recent cancer diagnosis. “Not good,” Dad said. “He doesn’t want to see me.” Why?       “Well,” he said, “I think it’s because he hasn’t accepted the idea that dying is the cost of living.” Wow, what insight.       I asked him what he could do. Oh, he said, he’d find a reason to go to the friend’s house to talk about the weather or the Cardinals or the peach crop. Just chat, you know, about things that, when rolled together, make up today and tomorrow.       “I just want him to know that each day is a gift from God regardless if it brings a baptism or a funeral,” he announced.       That really was the essence of my father. Life ebbed and flowed and he rode it back and forth without fear or favor. He never asked for love or loyalty, he didn’t lighten his load by adding to anyone else’s, and he was religious but never preachy.       Two, almost opposite, traits might explain him better: he was a very good fisherman and he loved to play cards.       Fishing, he would say, is mostly preparation—the right bait, local knowledge, good tackle—and patience. Neither, however, ensures you’ll catch fish. That’s why “It’s called ‘fishing’ and not ‘catching,’” he’d say on the days we spent more time fishing more than catching.       Card playing, however, is mostly luck; you, literally, play the cards you’re dealt. Skill in playing them also matters but skill rarely trumps the luck of the draw.       My father embodied those near-opposites; he was prepared for whatever luck—fishing or catching—brought.       One last memory: I once asked him, a diligent Bible reader (King James Version, please) what his favorite passage was. After reciting his baptism, confirmation, and wedding verses, he settled on one that made perfect sense to him, Matthew 6, verse 26:       “Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they?”       Ye—we—are, my father might say, today and tomorrow and everyday. That said, I’m pretty sure he’d still keep one eye fixed on Uncle Honey.   © 2020 ag comm   The Farm and Food File is published weekly throughout the U.S. and Canada. Past columns, events and contact information are posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com.

Be sure to visit Alan's web site for more articles.

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HOW ABOUT ONE FOR FUN??  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN-Csqdpji4

 

 





THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 3/15/2020 9:39pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Martin houses are ready.  Now we have to keep sparrows out of the houses until the Purple Martins show up.
  • Cleaned and topped off the raised beds.  They're ready.  We found some carrots in them that overwintered perfectly.  May have to plant carrots in late Sep or Oct and have carrots during the winter.
  • Green house is great.  Have had plenty of greens all winter.  It's really simple, three cattle panels, some 2x4's and a plastic covering.  I have no plans, just come by and take a picture.
  • Iris and Mattie are due to calve in about two weeks.  We will be back in milk.  We have had to get our milk from Heritage Dairy, a small dairy just north of Warrensburg.  It will be good to have Guernsey A2 milk again, with a lot of cream on top.
  • Beef cows are due to start calving at the end of the month as well.  Hopefully, the rain will slow down.  That makes it so much easier.  I have everything ready to renovate the pastures.  
  • KC Food Circle is cancelled for this year.  The location, JCCC, has closed for all events due to the COVID-19 issue.
  • We have all of our fence issues corrected and now the voltage is near 7000 volts.  It was usually only 2-3000.  That should make finding faults much easier.
  • Remember, the riddle what is green that turns blue when it thunders?  I'm modifying it to:  what is green, then brown, and finally blue when it thunders?   We had just 2/3 inch of basically light rain this past week and PostOak our local creek that drains into Blackwater and then the Missouri river was 2/3 full.  It was brown, just from a light rain.  It doesn't look good for spring flooding from Nebraska to Missouri.  We drove that route, and it has been almost entirely corn and soybeans previously.  There is nothing to hold the water.  
  • I am including several items on viruses.  Our source for cod liver oil is greenpasture.org.  Our supply is low and I'll be placing an order tomorrow.

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Dr. David Brownstein wrote a book entitled, Iodine, Why you need it, Why you can’t live without it.

Recently he blogged about how to keep yourself from getting the Corona Virus hereBE SURE TO CLICK THIS ONE.

An excerpt from the early part of that blog is as follows…

Wearing a mask will not help protect you from becoming ill with any viral infection—corona virus included. I would check that off the list.Corona Virus protection ??? IODINE !!!   LUGOLS IS A GOOD BRAND

 

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 "Why You Can Not Kill   a Virus"  https://youtu.be/EADzWlbSdVM

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"Exponential growth and epidemics"  https://youtu.be/Kas0tIxDvrg

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Here is a very interesting article by Dr Mercola. Be sure to read it in its entirety. The interview is also very good. https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/02/23/carnivore-code.aspx?cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art1HL&cid=20200223Z1&et_cid=DM466555&et_rid=816375810







THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com