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Posted 7/21/2019 10:47pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • Two peach trees have been decimated.  I have been dumping four 5 gallon buckets of beetles each day .  They are horrible when the weather is hot.  It was very hot this past week.  Hopefully, with cooler weather forecasted this week the beetle wave may decline.
  • July the 4th we had over 6 inches of rain, today almost four.  Grass is growing.  We have started clipping the pastures to control weeds.  We have the mover set to the maximum height.  We are just barely clipping the top of the lespedeza plants.  We started adding lespedeza seed several years ago as it is somewhat drought tolerant.  Well, it also does very well with a lot of rain.  It is over a foot tall.  It's a legume, like clover and provides a lot of nitrogen for the other grasses.  We don't use NPK which saves costs of production.
  • We are having a lot of green beans and the cucumbers are fantastic.  We had a serving of Kase Sahne Kuchen last night, and now I need to make some quark.  I checked the recipe for making quark and it seems not too difficult.

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If we want antibiotics to work, consumers have to put big pressure on factory farms

Consumers can vote with their dollars every time they purchase food that is safe, nutritious, sustainable and transparent .”



https://www.nationofchange.org/2019/06/06/if-we-want-antibiotics-to-work-consumers-have-to-put-big-pressure-on-factory-farms/



Every 15 years, the EPA is supposed to review the latest science on glyphosate, then issue a determination on whether this toxic chemical should be re-approved for another 15 years.

The last deadline for a new review of glyphosate was December 2015. But that deadline came and went with no word—probably because in March 2015, the World Health Organization inconveniently announced that glyphosate is a “probable human carcinogen.”

Three-and-a-half years past the 2015 deadline, the agency that’s supposed to protect your health came out with its unfounded “no risk to public health” claim.

 

We think “comments” aren’t enough.

That’s why we’re collaborating with our allies to storm the EPA and demand the agency do what it should have done decades ago: Ban glyphosate!

I guess the EPA has not been watching the news lately. There have been several recent trial verdicts, one with a $2 BILLION settlement for the defendants.

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Hawaii bans herbicides on school grounds https://www.nationofchange.org/2019/07/03/hawaii-bans-herbicides-on-school-grounds/


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Watch "My Theory on Dementia, Blood Pressure & Stroke - Dr. Eric Berg DC" on YouTube https://youtu.be/dq2herNm4Pc


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Watch "How to Know if You Have Bile Deficiency" on YouTube
https://youtu.be/vvagzivxGO0

 



 

 

 

 




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 7/15/2019 10:12pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • Saturday's ground beef pickup went very well.  The list has been updated and those who did not get an email notice have moved up and will be getting their requests on the next  ground beef day.  Thanks to all for being on time.  When it's hot, time is critical to get it into your freezer.
  • I just got an email request for a Dirt Hog.  I was caught up and now a new list is started.
  • Virginia is having a chicken day this Saturday.  Email her with your request, souscon4@gmail.com.
  • Sure is great to have tomatoes and green beans from the garden. Beets, Carrots, Cabbage, Broccoli and all the herbs.  Oh yes, the Blackberries.
  • The Japanese beetles are back. They have decimated my early peach trees again this year.  I have already dumped eight five gallon buckets of trapped beetles.  I thought last year was an anomaly, but i guess this is going to be an annual invasion.  I have a plan for next year.  I don't see any natural predators.

 

ACRES U.S.A. Are you suggesting that industrial organic actually functions hydroponically?

JEHNE. By definition, if we’re relying on high levels of fertilizers, we’re going to kill all these microbial interfaces, and then have to depend on that soil solution slush. Our industrially grown food often contains as little as a third of the nutrients as it did before World War II, according to reports published by the UK Ministry of Health, USDA and CSIRO Human Nutrition. You’d have to eat three carrots to get the same nutrients as a pre-World War II carrot. These industrially grown foods often have no trace minerals. And we’re seeing chronic, diet-induced chronic diseases — like Alzheimer’s, cancers and cardiac and immunological disease — go through the roof. Enzymes drive all of our biochemical functions. Enzymes are protein’s molecules, which have a mineral cofactor at their heart. If we don’t get those mineral cofactors through our nutrition, we can’t make those enzymes. Without selenium, for example, we can’t make peroxidase enzymes, which kill cancer cells in animals. We lack the capacity to regulate biochemistry because we’ve compromised our nutrition, though obviously it’s more complicated than that.

One more.  You've got to read the ENTIRE interview.

ACRES U.S.A. Globally, to what extent has human activity degraded productive land?

JEHNE. For the last 8,000 years of “human civilization,” we’ve been very effective at clearing and burning that land, cultivating those soils and building the industrial systems. We’ve oxidized the carbon and destroyed the biological cycles that underpin the health of those landscapes. We’ve done that with 5 billion hectares of land, turning 40 percent of the Earth’s land surface into desert and wasteland. Of the 13.9 billion hectares of ice-free land on this planet, about 40 percent — 5 billion hectares — has become manmade desert and wasteland, and we’re halfway through eating up that natural capital on the remainder. This is documented by United Nations Environment Programme data. Whereas we once had 8 billion hectares of old growth forest on this planet, we’ve cleared 6.3 billion hectares. Some of the forestlands that we’ve cleared have regenerated, like in New England, giving us 3 billion hectares of forest in total. We initially had about 5 billion hectares of grasslands rangelands, but we overgrazed, cultivated, degraded and burned that. The Sahara, Central Australia and the Middle East were all savannahs. Rome got lions and rhinoceros and other wildlife for the Coliseum from the savannahs of Libya. Today Libya is an arid wasteland. As we oxidize the carbon, by definition, those soils can’t infiltrate, retain, or make available water from rain. Invariably, they go to desert. That’s been the history of man on this planet. 

 

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To Combat Climate Change, Start From the Ground Up (With Dirt)

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/02/business/climate-change-soil-dirt.html

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Climate Change Is Intensifying Food Shocks

From rain-soaked fields in the Corn Belt to drowned livestock, food shocks—abrupt disruptions to food production—are becoming more common as a result of extreme weather.

https://civileats.com/2019/05/30/climate-change-is-intensifying-food-shocks/

 

 **********************************************

Right to Harm” takes viewers into the lives of those fighting the impacts of CAFOs in communities across the nation.

In North Carolina, people recall being sprayed with liquid manure when giant hog farms move in next door. In Arizona, residents struggle to breathe outside their homes because of fumes emitted from massive barns housing 4 million laying hens. In Wisconsin, where large dairy operations abound, wells are contaminated with rotovirus and salmonella.

These are some of the communities that appear in Right to Harm, a new documentary about the people living beside concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and the battles they’re waging to protect their health and quality of life.

It’s the latest project from Matt Wechsler and Annie Speicher, the filmmakers behind Sustainable, a film that shines a light on people producing food outside of the industrial system. In the process of making the first film, the team say they were tipped off to how communities living near factory farms were paying some of the invisible costs of “cheap” meat and dairy production.

 

Maybe the Jeff City crowd should have watched some of these films before there recent vote on local control. As usual one only needs to “follow the money”.




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 7/7/2019 10:30pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Well, we are up to 30 baby guineas.  The guinea hen hatched 15 and she really out did herself.
  • Had our first tomato last week.  Sure is nice to have a decent tomato.
  • Our grapes and elderberries are incredible this year.  I may have to get some carboys out and make some wine this year.
  • Peaches are just beautiful this year.  I'm holding my breath.  Last year we had the most awful japanese beetle confrontation.  They ruined all the fruit from one tree.  I trapped them by the five gallon bucket.  Many days I dumped two five gallon buckets each day.  I dumped so many that they began to smell just like a dead animal.
  • We had 6 and a half inches on rain in three days.  It was a real wet "dust bowl" with a lot of flooding.  I will include a link for a Joel Salatin podcast interview and during the interview he makes the statement that for each bushel of corn raised in Iowa they lose 2 bushels of topsoil.  Folks, that's not sustainable.  I read recently that England has 60 more years of food production and then there will be no more soil.   I know most don't believe that and may even label that "fake news".  But that coupled with the steady desertification that is happening worldwide is a very real concern.  The desertification is real as documented by aerial photos.
  • We will be having a ground beef pick up very soon.  However, we will not have enough for all the requests.  Therefore, when I get the final number of pounds I'll send an email notice.  Those not getting an email will move up to form the next list.  All requests are filed in the order received.

From the Organic Consumers Association.

Family farmers aren’t going out of business because they aren’t working hard enough, or smart enough.

America’s independent farmers—once both the backbone and lifeblood of rural American communities—are filing for bankruptcy at an alarming rate because U.S. food and farming policies are being written by Big Ag lobbyists who don't care about you, farmers, or the environment they pollute. Their only mission is to line the pockets of corporations like Monsanto-Bayer, Cargill, Tyson and others.

We often hear from some corners of the food movement that food shouldn’t be “political.”

But like it or not, consumers suffer when our country’s food & farming policies are stacked against small, independent farmers—including organic regenerative farmers who grow the kind of food we want, using practices that heal, not harm the Earth.

Bad policy decisions are why consumers don’t have clear labels on GMO foods.

Bad policy decisions are why so many of our foods are contaminated with residues of toxic weedkillers, antibiotics, arsenic, other heavy metals and all manner of drugs.

Bad policy decisions are why states like Iowa and Nebraska suffer from widespread water pollution directly attributable to factory farms.

And bad policy decisions are why we have to constantly fight to preserve strong USDA Organic standards.

In March, Sen. Warren rolled out a plan to take on Big Ag. Last week, Sen. Sanders rolled out his plan to revitalize rural American communities by supporting small farmers.

We aren’t suggesting that you vote for either of these candidates—as a nonprofit organization, we don’t endorse political candidates.

We would like you let these candidates—and any other candidates who talk about food & farming policy reform—know that you appreciate that they are making food and farming policy a key issue in the upcoming election.



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Tests reveal the nutrient content of foods has dramatically declined since the introduction of mechanized farming in 1925. As just one example, research by August Dunning, chief science officer and co-owner of Eco Organics, reveals that to receive the amount of iron you used to get from one apple in 1950, by 1998 you had to eat 26 apples; today you have to eat 36, and this is a direct consequence of industrial farming techniques and use of chemicals that destroy soil quality by killing essential microbes.

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/01/29/top-reasons-to-support-regenerative-agriculture.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20190129Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM263850&et_rid=531377477

I sure wish our local representative and senator would read this. It might help them in their voting on local control.

*******************************************************************

Hopefully, someone will screen this film locally.

https://civileats.com/2019/05/02/new-film-captures-the-brutal-reality-of-living-near-factory-farms/?fbclid=IwAR1wmbwkPOPsZMzTlkzYuwt5J0tQtGRQ6YPFnAZx_-ud1rg62UC_ADZiRSQ



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Monsanto ordered to pay $2 billion in Roundup cancer lawsuit.  Yes, that is billion with a B.

https://www.nationofchange.org/2019/05/14/monsanto-ordered-to-pay-2-billion-in-roundup-cancer-lawsuit/

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A controversial drug allowed in meat production in the U.S.—but banned in 160 other countries—is in the news again. This time, it’s because the Trump administration, as part of a trade deal, is trying to force China to allow imports of U.S. pork raised with ractopamine.

If you buy industrially produced pork at a U.S. supermarket, it likely contains ractopamine—about 60 – 80 percent of industrial pork producers use the drug. If Trump forces China to allow imports of U.S. pork raised with ractopamine, that percentage could increase—and so will Elanco’s profits.

Don't bother looking for ractopamine on labels—pork producers aren’t required to tell you they use ractopamine.

How can consumers avoid buying pork or other meat contaminated with ractopamine? Buy from a trusted local farmer, or look for the American Grassfed Association (AGA) logo—AGA-certified meat prohibits the use of ractopamine.  We maintain a list of local farmers who raise dirt hogs and don't use drugs, harmons, antibiotics etc.



More science behind burger appears to lead to more glyphosate in burger

A new article by

Excerpt…

We are shocked to find that the Impossible Burger can have up to 11X higher levels of glyphosate residues than the Beyond Meat Burger according to these samples tested. This new product is being marketed as a solution for “healthy” eating, when in fact 11 ppb of glyphosate herbicide consumption can be highly dangerous. Only 0.1 ppb of glyphosate has been shown to destroy gut bacteria, which is where the stronghold of the immune system lies. I am gravely concerned that consumers are being misled to believe the Impossible Burger is healthy.” stated Zen Honeycutt, Executive Director of Moms Across America.

To read the full story click here


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Health Benefits of Grass Fed Beef https://foodfacts.mercola.com/grass-fed-beef.html

More info on grass finished beef. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=141


Be aware there may be a difference between grass fed and grass finished.  Always ask!!


THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 6/23/2019 10:37pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • Thousands of pears, peaches and grapes.  The recent storms have removed a lot of the damaged fruit and dwarfs, but I still need to remove more.   
  • Our pond east of our house is in need of a major repair.  The overflow steel pipe has rusted and there is a hole and our water level is down about two feet.  We will need to dig out the entire pipe.  We plan to enhance our grass diversion berm and do away totally with the overflow pipe.
  • Our guinea numbers are up.  We had seven new keets before this past week, four hatched under a top hat hen and three from our incubator.  This past week a chicken hen hatched 11 and she has moved to another nest a guinea hen was on and has taken over.  So, we may have even more.  And there is another guinea hen on a nest.  Will be nice to have a bunch of guineas patrolling our yard.  Do they control ticks?  Maybe, we have more ticks this year and fewer guineas.
  • ACREs finally posted Walter Jehne's interview.  BE SURE TO READ THIS!!!  If you google Jehne there are several links they are rather technical.  This interview is very easy to read and understand.  https://www.ecofarmingdaily.com/supporting-the-soil-carbon-sponge/  

 

ACRES U.S.A. Are you suggesting that industrial organic actually functions hydroponically?

JEHNE. By definition, if we’re relying on high levels of fertilizers, we’re going to kill all these microbial interfaces, and then have to depend on that soil solution slush. Our industrially grown food often contains as little as a third of the nutrients as it did before World War II, according to reports published by the UK Ministry of Health, USDA and CSIRO Human Nutrition. You’d have to eat three carrots to get the same nutrients as a pre-World War II carrot. These industrially grown foods often have no trace minerals. And we’re seeing chronic, diet-induced chronic diseases — like Alzheimer’s, cancers and cardiac and immunological disease — go through the roof. Enzymes drive all of our biochemical functions. Enzymes are protein’s molecules, which have a mineral cofactor at their heart. If we don’t get those mineral cofactors through our nutrition, we can’t make those enzymes. Without selenium, for example, we can’t make peroxidase enzymes, which kill cancer cells in animals. We lack the capacity to regulate biochemistry because we’ve compromised our nutrition, though obviously it’s more complicated than that.

One more.  You've got to read the ENTIRE interview.

ACRES U.S.A. Globally, to what extent has human activity degraded productive land?

JEHNE. For the last 8,000 years of “human civilization,” we’ve been very effective at clearing and burning that land, cultivating those soils and building the industrial systems. We’ve oxidized the carbon and destroyed the biological cycles that underpin the health of those landscapes. We’ve done that with 5 billion hectares of land, turning 40 percent of the Earth’s land surface into desert and wasteland. Of the 13.9 billion hectares of ice-free land on this planet, about 40 percent — 5 billion hectares — has become manmade desert and wasteland, and we’re halfway through eating up that natural capital on the remainder. This is documented by United Nations Environment Programme data. Whereas we once had 8 billion hectares of old growth forest on this planet, we’ve cleared 6.3 billion hectares. Some of the forestlands that we’ve cleared have regenerated, like in New England, giving us 3 billion hectares of forest in total. We initially had about 5 billion hectares of grasslands rangelands, but we overgrazed, cultivated, degraded and burned that. The Sahara, Central Australia and the Middle East were all savannahs. Rome got lions and rhinoceros and other wildlife for the Coliseum from the savannahs of Libya. Today Libya is an arid wasteland. As we oxidize the carbon, by definition, those soils can’t infiltrate, retain, or make available water from rain. Invariably, they go to desert. That’s been the history of man on this planet. 

Maybe we do need to populate Mars.  We are on the road to converting our remaining arable land to desserts.

 

THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

 

(aozias@gmail.com)
(660) 656-3409
www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 6/16/2019 9:48pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Look at this photo and does it bring back memories?  If so, you are over sixty years old. 

This photo was in a Reminisce magazine issue.  When I was young we had three small groceries in my small hometown.  This would have been in a larger store.  You will notice the small choice in breakfast cereal.  What's on the left?  Dogfood and on the right is bread.  Today, dog food has its own isle and bread is at least a half of an isle. Cereal is pretty much an excuse to sell sugar and Cheerios has at last count 16 different choices.   Did you see the ten pack at the top?  We had to beg to get that.  If was a treat.  This young boy won the bicycle for collecting the most Wheaties box tops.  Those were the days.

  • Had a gooseberry pie for fathers day.  I had to stem them yesterday.  We had just enough for a pie.  When young we picked and stemmed gallons of berries.  We had no TV,so stemming berries was done in the evening after all the chores were done.
  • Only one person tried the green to blue riddle and he was pretty close.
  • Clover had her calf this past friday, a bull.  I have been milking her, and this morning she filled the five gallon bucket.  Still mostly colostrum.
  • We had diner at an Italian restaurant last night and an appetizer was the owner making fresh mozzarella tableside.  I had read many times how to make mozzarella and it seemed to involved.  Had to use a microwave and pull it, and on and on.  Well, after seeing how easy and delicious it is, the next time I have extra milk I will make mozzarella.  Along with fresh tomatoes, basil, sea salt, balsamic vinegar and olive oil; it was delicious.  I have never thought fresh mozzarella one finds in a store was very special, but now I know what truly fresh mozzarella tastes like.
  • I recently received an email concerning the Green New Deal (GND).  I was interested and signed on for updates.  Last week I received a lengthy email with a bunch of links for various presentations about regenerative agriculture.  I was surprised that most of the links were for the various people I've been following for several years, and have included  in my weekly updates.  So, I guess I'm glad to see there are others out there who are trying to right the ship.  If anyone is interested in that organization, just send me a request, and I will forward that email and you can get on their address list.  There is a semester amount of information in the email.
  • **********************************************************************
  •  

    Very Interesting Website!!! Watch “Soil is a Living Organism”. You may want to watch the other ones on that site.

    https://phc.eu/en/knowledge-information/film-video

    ********************************************************************

    As poet, farmer and wise man Wendell Berry says:

    “The passive American consumer, sitting down to a meal of pre-prepared food, confronts inert, anonymous substances that have been processed, dyed, breaded, sauced, gravied, ground, pulped, strained, blended, prettified, and sanitized beyond resemblance to any part of any creature that ever lived. The products of nature and agriculture have been made, to all appearances, the products of industry. Both eater and eaten are thus in exile from biological reality.”



    **********************************************************************

    On Tuesday, April 30, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) made it official: The agency plans to ignore what scientists say about glyphosate. It’s full speed ahead with the approval process.

    The EPA doesn’t care that a panel of 17 scientists at the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) unanimously concurred that glyphosate is a probable human carcinogen.

    The EPA doesn’t care that thousands of people who used Monsanto’s (now Bayer’s) Roundup weedkiller are suingthe company (and so far winning), because they believe that the product caused their cancer.

    The EPA doesn’t care about the one new study after another linking glyphosate to cancer, or liver, or kidney disease--in not just people directly exposed, but also in their future offspring.

    Nope, the EPA doesn’t even care that, despite Monsanto’s best efforts to kill it, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), released its long-awaited Draft Toxicological Profile for Glyphosate—which supports and strengthens the 2015 IARC “probable carcinogen” decision.

    It’s official. The EPA plans to ignore you, your health and the health of our common environment, to keep Roundup weedkiller on the market.

    Can we get Congress to care?



    **************************************************************

    Grass Fed or Lab Fed — Which Is Better for Your Health and the Environment? https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/05/06/grass-fed-or-lab-bred-meats.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20190506Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM286054&et_rid=608269570



    ********************************************************

    EPA claims glyphosate doesn’t cause cancer

    The announcement made by EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler on Tuesday comes at the same time there are currently 13,400 lawsuits against the controversial weedkiller

    https://www.nationofchange.org/2019/05/02/epa-claims-glyphosate-doesnt-cause-cancer/




     


THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)
(660) 656-3409
www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 6/9/2019 10:43pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Hi Art,

    We thought you would enjoy some feedback on the beef 🥩.. we “LOVE” it! Wonderful beef...  as we remember growing up with in our younger days. 

    Thank you for the TLC provided for the critters and customers... much appreciated.

    Enjoy the weekend ahead!  Thanks Karen and LARRY

  • Yes, We are still raising GRASS FiNISHED BEEF. We weighed beeves today and separated cows from the rest.  The  bull was added and it all starts anew. Those on our list for freezer beef have been notified.  That should catch us up for now.  We are still adding to our ground beef list and as soon as we have enough we will schedule that.
  • The forecast for commodity beef is for increasing prices due to the reduced acreages of corn and soybeans resulting from the extensive flooding.  We will keep our prices the same, as we do not depend on external inputs.  We have a lot of grass and hopefully that will continue throughout the summer.  We have a lot already stockpiled.  We only bale what we need for winter feeding.  We don't bale and sell our surpluses.  That would rapidly demineralize our soil.
  • Well, it's great to have your own asparagus, peas, strawberries and large heads of broccoli.  If you don't have a raised bed for gardening, you are missing a great resource.
  • Our fruit trees have been pretty good so far.   Sweet and pie cherries.  The peach trees are loaded and there are several new pear trees with a lot of pears.  
  • Anyone want a free SCOBY??  Just bring a wide mouth gallon jar.
  • We also have KEFIR grains to share.

 *************************************************

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • The conversion of large amounts of fertile land to desert has long been thought to be caused by livestock, such as sheep and cattle overgrazing and giving off methane. This has now been shown to be incorrect, as removing animals to protect lands speeds up desertification

  • According to Allan Savory, an African ecologist, dramatically increasing the number of grazing livestock is the only thing that can reverse both desertification and climate change

  • Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and large-scale monocrop farms directly contribute to climate change and environmental pollution

  • To improve soil quality, we must improve its ability to maintain water. Once land has turned to bone-dry desert, any rain simply evaporates and/or runs off. The solution is twofold: The ground must be covered with vegetation, and animals must roam across the land

  • In the documentary, “Running Out of Time,” Savory details his holistic herd and land management plan, and shows how land that has turned to desert can be brought back to become fertile and productive once again through the use of livestock

 

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/03/23/reverse-desertification.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20190323Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM275162&et_rid=574426532

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Watch "Grazing to Heal the Earth | Wendy Pratt | TEDxIdahoFalls" on YouTube https://youtu.be/suHCiRlT-oc

 ****************************************************

Geoff Lawton

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N225HDyIUe8

************************************************

 

Here is a link given at the recent presentation to the Citzens for Environmental Action.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrsFjW2dLi Q

https://www.discoverpermaculture.com/p/video-1-pdc-2019

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrsFjW2dLi Q





THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)
(660) 656-3409
www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 5/26/2019 10:12pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • I finally got my fruit tree traps refilled about a week ago.  Trees are just loaded with small fruit.  Looks like cherries will be ripe soon.  I ate a sweet cherry today, but it was not quite ripe.  I didn't do my usual pruning this year, due to the extremely wet spring, and it shows.  It now is harder to do with leaves on the limbs.  I have removed a bunch of dwarfs and doubles, and still have many to do.  
  • I think I had in a recent UPDATE that the grasses in my pastures was waist high.  Well, they are now even taller.  My border collie has to jump up to see and then run to stay ahead of me on my 4-wheeler.  It's hard to find the thistles when I'm out spraying.  I go back in a couple of days and find the ones I missed hidden in the grass.  They grow fast and are forced to get tall as grass is so tall.
  • Anyone want a SCOBY or Kefir grains???  They are free.  Just bring a jar.  Lime, Ginger KOMBUCHA is a great drink, especially as the temperatures increase.
  • Does anyone do riddles anymore?  That used to be a common thing back when, before the internet, smart phones and Netflix.  Here's one.  We'll see who can solve it.  "When it thunders and lightnings, what is green that becomes blue?"  Today that is more true than in past years.  Send your answers to me and I'll include the results in an upcoming UPDATE.
  • This month we've had several liquid "dust storms".

 *********************************************************************

 

STORY AT-A-GLANCE  VERY IMPORTANT ARTICLE

  • The conversion of large amounts of fertile land to desert has long been thought to be caused by livestock, such as sheep and cattle overgrazing and giving off methane. This has now been shown to be incorrect, as removing animals to protect lands speeds up desertification

  • According to Allan Savory, an African ecologist, dramatically increasing the number of grazing livestock is the only thing that can reverse both desertification and climate change

  • Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and large-scale monocrop farms directly contribute to climate change and environmental pollution

  • To improve soil quality, we must improve its ability to maintain water. Once land has turned to bone-dry desert, any rain simply evaporates and/or runs off. The solution is twofold: The ground must be covered with vegetation, and animals must roam across the land

  • In the documentary, “Running Out of Time,” Savory details his holistic herd and land management plan, and shows how land that has turned to desert can be brought back to become fertile and productive once again through the use of livestock

 

 

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/03/23/reverse-desertification.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20190323Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM275162&et_rid=574426532

 

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This is just amazing. Anyone who has tagged a new born calf will appreciate this. I used to, and after nearly been the victim of a protective new momma cow, I decided to wait a few weeks, get them in a pen all by themselves and tag them with their mommas on the other side of the corral fence. I can't blame the cow, they are doing exactly what I want a new mother to do, protect her new born against anything including me.

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHkzZqB-LuE

 

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STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Nearly half of America’s cropland is devoted to GMO crops, including over 140 million acres of GE corn, soybeans and cotton; 70 to 80 percent of supermarket, restaurant and school cafeteria processed foods are contaminated with GE corn, soy, canola, high fructose corn syrup and cotton seed/vegetable oil

  • Ninety percent of U.S. meat and animal products come from factory farms, where livestock are fed GE animal feed (corn and soy), and routinely given animal drugs and growth promoters

  • Unless we can shut down the factory farms, rebuild our soils, restore our watersheds and forests and get rid of the toxins, GMOs and greenhouse gases contaminating our bodies and our environment, mounting evidence suggests we may soon, perhaps in the space of one generation, pass the point of no return

  • Industrial, GMO-tainted, pesticide-laden, factory-farmed foods are bad for your health, bad for farm animals, bad for small farmers and farmworkers, bad for the environment and bad for the climate

  • Groups including the Organic Consumers Association, Beyond Pesticides and Food & Water Watch, have launched numerous lawsuits, suing companies for fraudulently labeling their products as natural, pasture-raised, ecofriendly or U.S.-made, when they are not

 

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/03/19/degeneration-nation.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20190319Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM275123&et_rid=571539147

 

 

 




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)
(660) 656-3409
www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 5/19/2019 9:32pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • We are about to run out of guineas.  We have two hens left and both are laying.  We have collected for about a month and have two chickens hens setting.  We also have about twenty in our incubator and the two guinea hens are still laying.  We will let them set and maybe we will have our numbers back.  
  • The raised beds are the answer, especially when one has a very wet spring.  This spring would have been a disaster in a garden.  It's amazing how much can be raised in a 4 x 8 raised bed.  We have about four that size.  We use drip irrigation.  Haven't needed it this spring yet.
  • The ground beef list is filling, and I have a couple of people on the Dirt Hog list.  You should see our pastures this spring.  With so much rain, the grasses are waist deep.  We are  moving the cattle much more frequently that we did last year.  I sprayed some thistles this afternoon; took advantage of some sun and no rain.
  • We had a brisket last week and wow, it was excellent.  On our next ground beef  day we will again be taking orders for briskets and roasts.

From Chapter 5: Insects

A properly balanced soil will have sufficient quantities of organically active carbon — humus — which helps hold nitrogen in the ammoniacal form. In soils lacking this active carbon content, the soil will give up this ammoniacal nitrogen to bacterial conversion into nitrates or directly to the atmosphere in gaseous form. During the process of ammoniacal nitrogen leaving the soil, it passes by the plant and can act as an amplifier of the infrared signal coming from the plant. Whereas the plant may have been initially broadcasting the signal, “I’m not balanced nutritionally,” the signal now reads, “Come and feed on me!”

Dr. Reams taught that most insects do not attack healthy plants. His whole approach to plant fertility and insect control capitalized on supplying the soil balanced forms of plant food which, in turn, maximized plant health. Insects look for signals coming from unhealthy plants and seldom attack healthy ones. Insects willingly eat weeds and will return to that practice in fields with healthy crops and soils and unhealthy (low brix) weeds. The attacking of weeds by insects is one of the signs to look for in observing your progress toward sustainable agriculture.


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STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Worldwide, more than 40 percent of insect species are threatened with extinction in the next few decades

  • Overall, the total mass of insects is said to be falling by a “shocking” 2.5 percent a year; if this rate continues unchecked, insects could disappear within 100 years

  • Habitat loss due to land converted to intensive agriculture, as well as urbanization, are major threats to insects

  • The next most significant contributor to insect declines is pollution, primarily that from synthetic pesticides and fertilizers

  • The best course of action to reduce the harm industrial agriculture is having on insects is to support organic, grass fed farms that are not relying on synthetic chemicals and other intensive agriculture practices



https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/02/26/insect-population-decline.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art2&utm_campaign=20190226Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM270406&et_rid=554848540


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For instance, between 2008 and 2013, wild bees declined 23 percent in the U.S., particularly in the Midwest, Great Plains and the Mississippi valley, where grain production, primarily corn for biofuel, nearly doubled during the same period.4 Further, according to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), more than 8 million acres of grassland and wetlands have been converted to corn from 2008 to 2011.5

Overall, since the U.S. government began requiring ethanol in fuel in 2007, more than 1.2 million acres of grassland have been lost to corn (and soy) crops.6 Along with direct loss of habitat, agricultural intensification also involves other practices that are damaging to insects, namely:

  • Stream channelization

  • Draining of wetlands

  • Modification of floodplains

  • Removal of canopy cover near rivers and streams

  • Loss of soil and nutrients

Monocrops Cannot Support Biodiverse Insect Populations

At one time, all food was grown organically in concert with nature and surrounding ecosystems



Even as most of the world works to reduce emissions, new studies confirm that it will be impossible to stop climate change without changing agriculture. Soil degradation is slowly turning a third of the world into desert. At this rate, fertile soil will be depleted in 60 years.

What exactly does soil have to do with climate change? In the atmosphere, too much carbon overheats the climate. But in the ground, carbon is useful.

Loss of topsoil releases carbon into the air. Modern petroleum-fueled agriculture, beginning around 1930, has released 50 to 70 percent of soil’s carbon into the atmosphere. In a report last year, the U.N. warned that the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere increased at record speed to hit a level not seen for more than 3 million years.



https://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/dirt/climate-solution-regenerative-farming-20190312?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=YTW_20190315&utm_content=YTW_20190315+CID_4bd666cd191415271430ffffc67632f1&utm_source=CM&utm_term=The%20Climate%20Solution%20Right%20Under%20Our%20Feet

A must watch short film!!!!

https://www.patagoniaprovisions.com/pages/unbroken-ground


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Ground Beef Link in Six State E. coli Outbreak

https://www.ecoliblog.com/e-coli-outbreaks/ground-beef-link-in-six-state-e-coli-outbreak/






THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)
(660) 656-3409
www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 4/28/2019 10:20pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • Fed my next to the last bale of hay today.  I have one more and it will be fed after this week's forecasted rains.  We had just enough, even though we had that very dry weather last fall, and didn't have much of a fall hay crop.  
  • We have one more pasture to renovate and seed and that will be done for the year.
  • Debra made a peach cobbler for dinner today.  It was excellent, lots of peaches.  It brought back memories of my battle this past summer with the Japanese beetles.  That was horrible.  Lost a whole tree of peaches.  The orchard looks great this year.  Haven't had any threats of a late frost.  I still need to do a little pruning.
  • We are enjoying fresh asparagus and greens from our garden.  Sure is nice to stay out of the grocery store.  Spring is a great time.  Not so hot, and everything is green, except for my neighbors' bare soil.  It's still brown and will only be green for a few months.  Maybe someday the USDA will pay half the cost of cover crops to improve the biology of the soil.
  • We are fighting in Jefferson City  against state control over local control .  Our local senator says he travels the roads from his home to Jeff and sees how "farmers" are supplying our food and taking care of their farms.  He must have found roads that I have yet to travel.  I usually find the less traveled roads, and my experience is quite different.  I don't see any food that makes it to my table.  Now if "farmers" were to start raising green beans, pinto beans, lima beans, speckled butter beans and leave soybeans in the bag.  Some of the corn (40%) and much of the soybean crop feed our cars and CAFOs .  Many of you have done your own research into the problems that result from confined feeding of animals.
  • I am pretty sure if we get the rain that is forecast this week, we will have another liquid dust storm.  Our local streams and rivers will be just as brown as the ever present bare soils.

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STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Emulsifiers in processed foods could be wreaking havoc on the microbes in your intestines, leading to metabolic problems and even affecting your brain

  • Because your gut and brain communicate via your gut-brain axis, altering microbes in your gut can influence anxiety and behavior, leading researchers to speculate that consuming emulsifiers may also influence mental health and behavior

  • A study confirmed that exposure to emulsifiers led to chronic intestinal inflammation, obesity and altered gut microbiota composition in mice

  • Emulsifiers trigger chronic, low-grade inflammation in your body, to which depression is strongly linked

  • The best way to avoid emulsifiers in your diet is to avoid processed foods and eat real, whole foods instead.



https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/02/07/processed-food-emulsifiers-health-risks.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art2&utm_campaign=20190207Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM265621&et_rid=538863794

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Here's a great talk by Allan Savory.  BE SURE TO WATCH THIS.  IT IS ONLY 22  MINUTES.  SEND THIS TO MANY OF YOUR  FRIENDS. https://youtu.be/vpTHi7O66pI

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Could a Root Canal Be the Cause of Your Chronic Health Problem?

 

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/02/09/root-canal-infection.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20190209Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM265635&et_rid=540026681

 

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Catnip: An Herb That You and Your Cat Would Love

https://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/catnip.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art3&utm_campaign=20190214Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM267249&et_rid=545769534

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Link from presentation at the local Environmental group.

https://youtu.be/m7IuY1MpTBY




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)
(660) 656-3409
www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 4/14/2019 9:47pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • I got a call from one of my Dirt Hog farmers.  If you're interested let me know if you want a whole or half.  They will be processed at Gilbert's.  
  • Calving continues and thankfully our timing has been great.  We even dodged forecasted snow this morning.  Looks like the weather will be great for the remaining calves.  Having calves in Jan and Feb just makes no sense.
  • The ground beef list is growing.  We will be delivering freezer beef orders this week.  We have five to deliver to eleven different customers.  One will be to Warsaw. Mo.  That's a first.  We will stop by Morgan County Seeds on the way home to stock up on garden supplies.  
  • How many of you have thought about that horse video I included last week?  If that were my horse, back in the day, it would have taken off for the barn.   I would have run away from that cow and walked home.  How did they train that horse???
  • Wow, the martin houses are full.  I have a few more gourds and I guess I'll add them later.

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  • Ever wonder how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) could continue to support the use of glyphosate—even after 17 of the world’s best scientists at the World Health Organization (WHO) concluded that the key active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller is a “probable human carcinogen”?

new study published this week in Environmental Sciences Europe answers that question. As it turns out, the EPA based its conclusions on unpublished industry studies—99 percent of which found that glyphosate doesn’t damage your DNA.

The scientists at WHO’s International Agency on Cancer Research (IARC), on the other hand, relied on non-industry, published, peer-reviewed studies—and 74 percent of those found that glyphosate does damage DNA.

Gee, wonder how that happened? Could Monsanto lobbyists have had something to do with which studies the EPA used, and which ones it ignored?



Make sure you read the entire article. This is an amazing interview. https://www.ecofarmingdaily.com/rethinking-pandoras-potatoes/


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STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Most growing environmental and health problems can be traced back to modern food production, including malnutrition, promotion of foodborne illnesses and drug-resistant bacterial infections, diminishing water supplies, and air, soil and water pollution

  • The answer to all of these problems hinges on the widespread implementation of regenerative agriculture and biodynamic farming

  • Reasons to support regenerative agriculture include the fact that it promotes optimal nutrition and health, rebuilds topsoil, protects water sources and minimizes irrigation, prevents environmental pollution and restores damaged ecosystems

  • Food from animals raised on regenerative farms also minimize the risks of foodborne illnesses and drug-resistant diseases

  • Certifications to look for, denoting the highest quality foods grown according to regenerative principles, include Demeter (biodynamic certification) and the American Grassfed Association (AGA) certification

Tests reveal the nutrient content of foods has dramatically declined since the introduction of mechanized farming in 1925. As just one example, research by August Dunning, chief science officer and co-owner of Eco Organics, reveals that to receive the amount of iron you used to get from one apple in 1950, by 1998 you had to eat 26 apples; today you have to eat 36, and this is a direct consequence of industrial farming techniques and use of chemicals that destroy soil quality by killing essential microbes.

 

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/01/29/top-reasons-to-support-regenerative-agriculture.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20190129Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM263850&et_rid=531377477

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Link to Environmental talk.   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N225HDyIUe8




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)
(660) 656-3409
www.breezy-hill-farm.com