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Posted 10/19/2020 10:47pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • The next beef harvest is now set.  Normally, I just do two at a time.  This time due to the processors being booked through until next summer, I was able to get a block of eight in a two day period.  That made it easy with more flexibility to match requests, but so many more to match up.  One person did not respond to several emails and even two text messages.  He had a half of dirt hog at the processor and I had not received his payment.     Here is the email I received today, N hospital on vent. Will call when out. Pls pray. Call butcher 4 me.
    Thx
    R.   
  • Covid is real, folks.  I'll pick up his pork tomorrow to avoid storage costs, and I'll put him on my next dirt hog list in December if that's his decision. 
  • The next ground beef pickup will be Nov 21.  There may not be enough for all requests.  We have another scheduled for mid December.
  • Debra has successfully gotten 24 keets to the point where two guinea hens have taken over and are making sure they stay together and get in and roosted up at night.  Debra had gone down each night to make sure they were safe.  Now the adults are in charge.
  • Are you noticing all the brown fields as you drive to work or town?  Yes, the corn and soybeans even stopped months ago photosynthesising  and storing carbon in the soil.  We will have to wait until next June and then for only two or three months.  

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  • "This time last year, Tyrone Gustafson’s small Iowa slaughterhouse and butchering facility, Story City Locker, was operating at about 80 percent capacity. Today, he estimates the demand has surged to approximately 120 percent and his slaughter and butchering schedule is booked out through the end of 2021."  see entire article, https://civileats.com/2020/10/19/the-pandemic-has-the-potential-to-finally-transform-meat-processing-in-the-u-s/ 

     

     

  • Hi Art!

    Keep up the good work! We’ve really enjoyed our beef and the dirt hog! The bacon is AMAZING!!

    We’ve got every possible freezer full still. What’s the next date in 2021? I saw you mentioned June, but is there anything before that? If not, please put us on your list for June. 

    Thanks so much. Can’t say enough about having great meat in my freezer!!

    Stay safe, we need you!!

    Jennifer

  • ******************************************
  • Here’s a show for you… Embracing the Connection Between Agriculture and Health with Zach Bush episode of Regenerative Agriculture Podcast.  This is an excellent Podcast.




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 10/11/2020 8:45pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • We weighed the beeves yesterday, and I sent an email to all I had on my list for freezer beef.  If you did not get that email let me know soon.  We have had several move their request to next June.  One person moved out of state.  When I took all those requests in Feb and Mar, I had the feeling that some would cancel as soon as the meat counters filled again.  So much for supporting a local, small producer, and voting against the Big Three meat packers, and the CAFO production method.
  • I do have space for dirt hog pork for December.  Let me know and I'll add your name.
  • It's been a while since I have updated my list for the next ground beef.  We usually have a ground beef day in the fall.  I have a processor date for Nov10.  So, I need to get that list up-to-date.




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 9/13/2020 9:13pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Raising guineas is a challenge.  Remember, we had a guinea hen hatch out either ten or eleven babies sometime ago (hard to count them they are so little and so quick).  Well, now there are none.  We were down to a  single one and then this past week something got it.  It had grown to  about half size, so we thought surely it would make it.  There are just too many higher up in the food chain.  Owls, hawks, snakes, maybe a barn cat, maybe a feral cat, maybe a dog, varmints (raccoon, possum) and lost one to down pouring rain.  Debra, with the help of some setting hens (chicken) and three guinea hens, hatched out 26 this past two weeks.  They are in a pen in the chicken house and they will stay there until much bigger.  They will be eating game bird starter and will have to learn later how to harvest ticks and bugs from the twelve remaining adult guineas.
  • About two weeks ago there was a news item in the KC Star about a bunch of bisons escaping from a feedlot in Nebraska.  Just to remind everyone, the Bison in the meat counters at the grocery most were finished in a feedlot, just like the beef items.  About 70 percent of Bison are from a CAFO.
  •  Robert sent me a link to a recent interview on KKFI, https://archive.kkfi.org/BE SURE TO SCROLL DOWN TO SEPTEMBER 9 AT 9 AM.  IT'S LISTED UNDER ALTERNATIVE RADIO, CLICK PLAY.  I have been a fan of Ralph Nader for many years,  probably because he has been someone fighting against corporate consolidation and control for many years.   He is 86 and as sharp as ever.  Had we listened to him years ago, we would not be in the situation we now find ourselves.  We would not have just three meat processors, two or three major banks, two or three major oil companies ,etc.  Also, probably no Citizens United.  Just how is my signature when I registered to vote some twenty years ago??  He mentioned that, and sure enough on the national news this past week they had a segment on that.  And how do young people now sign their names?? Heaven help us.
  • Wow, I just checked my starred emails that I need to respond to.  Ground beef, how much does a half cost, do you have any beef,etc.  With recuperating from the knee replacement, I have just not had the inclination to do "book work".  Sorry, I will get caught up this coming week.
  • I highly recommend an article in the latest issue (September page 36) of ACRES USA.  It is written by Fred Provenza, Phd.  The title is , Eating as a Creative Act.  The first paragraphs are powerful.  "Things change.  No  assertion could be more banal.  Yet, within that statement lies a profound truth.  From birth, all things, -individuals, social groups, nations, species, galaxies, and universes- carry the seeds for their dissolution.  Things never change.  Within that assertion, too , is a profound truth: what we call "death" is endless transformation- the never ending dance of energy and transformation. "
  • I'll try to get a digital of that article and post it.

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I finished the book "Food Fix: How to Save Our Health, Our Economy, Our Communities, and Our Planet--One Bite at a Time" by Mark Hyman M.D. and wanted to share this quote with you.

"Our food system isn’t just making the world’s population sick; it’s making the environment sick. When we eat a hamburger, fries, and a soda, or even a green smoothie, it is hard to imagine the vast web that produced that food, and its potential to heal or harm humans, the environment, the climate, and the economy. We are insulated from the implications of our diet by the anonymity of our food. Where was it grown? How was it grown? What is the health of the soil and the impact of how the food was grown on nutrient levels in the food? Who grew it? What are their working conditions? What resources were used to grow it? What impact does our food have on our soils, our water, the biodiversity and survival of insect, animal, and plant species, the oceans, pollution, climate change, our health, and our long-term economic well-being as individuals and nations? For many, the link between what we eat and its effect on the planet seems distant. You probably don’t think about climate change, agricultural practices, or the potential for the extinction of our species when you chomp down on your dinner. It would be overwhelming. But each of us should know the food web we live in. We can no longer be complacent in the anonymity of our food. Learning what we have done to create these problems and what we have to do to solve them is essential to our collective future. I wish this were just hyperbole, but sadly it is not. This is not so much about saving the planet as about saving humanity.

CHAPTER 15 WHY AGRICULTURE MATTERS: FOOD AND BEYOND Since the dawn of agriculture in Mesopotamia 10,000 to 12,000 years ago, we have been growing food, which has allowed the rise of civilization. However, the history of agriculture is littered with our destructive habits born of a lack of knowledge of natural systems, resulting in vast ecological damage. The Roman Empire fell in part because of the demise of its agriculture, the result of destructive practices that depleted the soil.  Many other civilizations have suffered the same fate. In Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, Yuval Noah Harari disabuses us of any notions of an idyllic past when humans lived sustainably on the Earth. In previous eras, however, the scale of our destruction was smaller, and there was more unspoiled territory, which meant new lands to farm. Most of us don’t think much about farming, except that it’s fun to go to the farmers’ market on a Saturday morning. At the turn of the twentieth century, half of all Americans were farmers; now it’s only 1 to 2 percent. But while agriculture may seem like a distant concern best left to farmers, we must all come to terms with the fact that it is the most important aspect of our world today. Not only because we need to eat, but also because we need a planet to live on. Like it or not, we have to dig into the dirt of how we grow our food and its impact so we can find a new way to feed the world without destroying it. Innovations in agriculture over the last century have allowed us to produce more food than ever, but at a serious cost. The methods we use to grow food are contributing to our future inability to grow food, by increasing greenhouse gas emissions, raising temperatures, and making current cropland unfarmable. As global temperatures rise we may have to grow corn in Siberia, not Iowa. Not to mention the extractive methods of farming, which deplete soil and water and create chemical pollution (from nitrogen fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides), destroying species including pollinators, rivers, lakes, and oceans. "

Start reading this book for free: https://a.co/401xVxU

 





THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 8/27/2020 9:19pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE


  • I have a new knee.  Has gone well so far.  I'm still using a walker.  I've had little interest in sending my weekly update so things are piling up.
  • Guess what?  Iris is still alive.  She was finally diagnosed with Bovine Leukosis Virus.  I was sure she was going to die that first two weeks even though our veterinary had done what he thought was appropriate.  When she further deteriorated I decided to use some sulfa boluses, I have had for several years.  We did that for ten days and put her on a 4% sea salt water and voila, she has recovered and doing fine.
  • The purple martins have gone.  We did our part and now they just need to make it to Central America or Brazil and then return next year and we'll do it all over again.  We have twelve new gourds for next years expansion.  
  • We now have several guinea hens and some chickens setting on more guinea eggs.  Their time is about up, so we'll see.
  • Debra has been very busy tending to me and canning tomatoes, pears and grape juice.
  • We have some melon seeds available.  We have been raising this melon for at least ten years.  It is a French melon.   It is the best melon you will ever eat.  They are superb.  We save our seeds every year for next years garden.  If you want five seeds, send us a self addressed envelope and as long as they last we'll share this great melon with you.

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Want to get what you

want??  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9UIF852Boo&t=41s

**********************************************************************

Here is another very good presentation, enjoy.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ug1MnU6LKw&t=50s




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 8/9/2020 8:22pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • I think the martins have finally left.  There is one pair still here.  I noticed last week that they have three hungry mouths poking out of the  entrance.  I wondered then if they will be flying south with the others.  We'll see.  I don't recall that ever happening before.  This pair had a very late hatch.  I'll keep you posted.
  • Our guinea pair now have only two babies.  Snake got one recently and the downpour we think got one.
  • We have some hens that want to set.  Debra has tried and tried to break them, but with no success.   So, the decision is, let them set,  only on some of the guinea eggs.  After losing so many of the young ones we need to hatch some more and try again.
  • The next UPDATE will be with the farmer having a new knee.  Maybe it will work as well as the hip replacement three years ago and I will be able to get around much better.

 ************************************************

The American food system is not broken -- it is functioning as designed, a system optimized for efficiency, not one optimized for resilience and nutrition. But our food system is killing us, and that happened long before Covid-19. It is bound to continue unless we take steps now to leverage food as medicine.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/02/opinions/us-nutrition-insecurity-snap-goel-nischan-frist-coliccio/index.html

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 I'm reading "Food Fix: How to Save Our Health, Our Economy, Our Communities, and Our Planet--One Bite at a Time" by Mark Hyman M.D. and wanted to share this quote with you.

"The soil is home to a large proportion of the world’s genetic biodiversity. There are more microbes in a handful of soil than all the humans that ever lived. The soil food web is the whole life cycle of the Earth. When soil is depleted, small insects die, then larger insects that eat the small ones die, and then the birds, small mammals, and amphibians that eat the insects die, which is why these populations are crashing around the world."

Here is another statement made in the Food Fix book.  "What has happened has led us to an agricultural and food crisis. Remember we have only sixty harvests left from our soil if we continue farming as usual. That should alarm you. It certainly shocked me."

 

One more.   "THE LOSS OF BIODIVERSITY: WHY SHOULD YOU CARE? If the bee disappeared off the face of the Earth, man would only have four years left to live. —ALBERT EINSTEIN"

 

 

THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 8/2/2020 10:57pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Do you remember about two UPDATES ago that the rain was going just to the north or just to the south.  We were getting very dry.   Well, that all changed this past week.  Monday 4.88, Wednesday 1.46, Thursday 4.64 and Friday 3.99 inches.   That's 14.97.  That was a lot of rain in a very short time.  Water went over our pond bank.   It will take a month for the top soil to  settle.  Our neighbor is a corn, bean  commodity producers.  The pond just east of our house is now full, and since it drains established pasture, the water is still clear.   Apparently, we have very little compaction as the ground is still firm and not muddy with all that rain.  No compaction and good tilth and water will percolate down in to the subsoil.
  • Raising guineas is sure a challenge.  Two nights ago Debra observed a black snake with a small baby guinea being killed.  Well, it was an eye for an eye.   We are now down to four from 10.  We have lost half ot the older group.  Our guinea hens are laying again.  One started setting this week.  Always fighting  nature's food chain.
  • We were ready to cut our fall hay crop and then 14.97 inches and now maybe this next week.

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#BoycottBigMeat

 

This just happened. Finally, hope it helps. There are many things that need to happen to make this work. We don't have enough veterinaries, producers, and processors and a totally misaligned national farm bill.

“Boycott Big Meat” is a national consumer education and lobbying campaign to advance the transition away from today’s centralized industrial meat production to a system of organic regenerative pasture-raised and grass-fed meat production built and run by a diverse network of local and regional independent farmers, ranchers, processors, and retailers who are committed to:

• Justice, including fair pay and safe working conditions, for all producers and workers throughout the supply chain;

• Respect for animals and all natural systems, including water, nutrient, and carbon cycles; and

• Public health, through the production of drug- and pesticide-free meat and animal products.

"Boycott Big Meat" was launched in July 2020, with several partners, including Forward LatinoSocially Responsible Agricultural ProjectMercola.comRegeneration International and the national coalition of U.S. Farmers & Ranchers for a Green New Deal. The campaign is endorsed by dozens of food, farm, climate and social and environmental justice organizations.

The COVID-19 crisis exposed as never before how our highly centralized industrial meat production system, dominated by a handful of huge corporations, exploits family farmers, slaughterhouse workers, and the environment—all while providing us with unhealthy pesticide- and drug-contaminated food. While the campaign is named "Boycott Big Meat," it's really about building something better. This is a campaign about taking back our food system from exploitive absentee corporations who care nothing about the communities where they locate their operations, and putting meat production back in the hands of producers who live in the communities they serve..





Sens. Booker and Warren recently called for a Congressional investigation into Big Meat’s practices during the pandemic. In a press release, the Senators explained why Congress should demand answers from the country’s largest industrial meat producers:

“United States Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Cory Booker (D-N.J.) are opening an investigation of Tyson Foods, JBS USA, Cargill and Smithfield Foods after reports that the meatpacking companies, while threatening the American public with impending meat shortages and jacking up prices, exported a record amount of product to China. The companies used the COVID-19 pandemic -- and warning of shortages -- as cover while they endangered workers, dramatically increased prices for American consumers, and successfully lobbied the President to sign an executive order designating their plants as critical infrastructure and allowing them to continue operating in an unsafe fashion.”

It’s time to stop buying and consuming food products that we know are bad for our health, bad for the environment, bad for small farmers, bad for food chain workers, bad for animals and bad for the climate.

Those of us who hate factory farms and love animals need to stop fighting among ourselves about whether to eat meat or not. Americans need to boycott all factory farm meat and animal products, and purchase only meat and animal products that are raised organically and regeneratively.

We are what we eat. We must get rid of Big Meat, CAFOs and giant slaughterhouses. We must put the Earth’s billions of confined farm animals back outside on the 8 billion acres of pastureland and rangeland, grazing and foraging, where they belong.

The next time you pull out your wallet at a grocery store, or contemplate eating out rather than cooking at home, think before you act. Boycott Big Meat and industrial food, today and every day. Join us in building up an organic and regenerative food system. The hour is late. But we still have time to turn things around.

It's going to be an uphill struggle.  They are two lines almost anytime of the day at our local McDonald's.







THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 7/26/2020 10:27pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Ticks.  We have our guineas to take care of ticks.  They seem to be doing a great job.  We rarely have a tick, however this year and somewhat last year, we now have ticks so small that you don't know you've been bitten.  But there it is.  Almost need a magnifying glass.  They are about the size of a flake of ground pepper.  It takes a sharp pointed set of tweezers to extract them.  Then you have a red itchy bump for a couple of days.  I guess they are evolving to avoid the guineas.
  • Purple martins are still here and my, have we been successful this year.  We have thirty or forty, seems like, at each gourd complex.  There's a bunch of martins.  I wonder, will I have to raise some mosquitos for them next year?  I'm sure they feed on more than mosquitos. 
  • I'm reading Food Fix, by Dr Mark Hyman. Yes, I'm aware of everything I've read so far.  It's just that this stuff has happened over two or three decades, a drip at a time.  It's nice to have someone do the research, dig up all the references and put it in paragraphs that are readable.   Putting it ALL into context and in book form is essential to understanding just how bad our food system has become.  Should you buy the book?   Well, if nobody buys a book, then no one will write a book.  It falls into the same idea as voting with your dollars and forks in hoping to affect change .
  • I have stopped buying books as my book shelves are full.   I now use Kindle.  It is so convenient.  Highlight a word and get the definition.  Click on a reference and voila, you have the text of the reference.  Highlight a passage and I can share it via the internet.  Oh, and I can store a million books on an old tablet that cost about $150.  How much would a bookcase cost??  And how long does it take to find a book in a bookcase??
  • I am pausing this UPDATE to watch, United Shades of America, on CNN.  It will be rebroadcast next Saturday.  W.Kamau Bell does a great job with his program which was about family farms this week. Look it up and watch it.

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We Don’t Even Choose ‘Herd Immunity’ For Livestock 

Alan Guebert      

Two generations ago, no one in the cattle business ever thought “herd immunity” was a solution to bovine brucellosis. Instead, farmers and ranchers, often with the help of U.S. Department of Agriculture veterinarians, blood-tested every animal they could find to discover, trace, and isolate the disease’s source and spread.      It was hard, dirty work but it was the best science available until a vaccine virtually eliminated the costly disease.      Today, more than a few politicians suggest herd immunity as an effective way to fight America’s again-raging Covid-19 pandemic. These folks can’t be farmers or ranchers because, if they were, they’d know rural people aren’t as cavalier about the lives of their animals as some politicians seem to be about the lives of their constituents.      Besides, herd immunity, according to experts at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, often is deadly to acquire. An adequate level of herd immunity against Covid-19 requires 60 to 70 percent of the world to become infected and—here’s the hard part—survive coronavirus over a period of 18 to 24 months. During that time, they estimate, 800,000 Americans would die before our herd—you and me—would become modestly immune.      So, who wants to go first?      I don’t remember one cow ever dying before, during, or after “bangs” testing. I do remember, though, that everyone—we, our neighbors, and the nation—benefited from our safe, collective efforts.      Today’s collective Covid effort has been anything but collective and now millions of Americans face years of untold hardship. Even rural America, that vast sea of cultural tranquility, is shaking at its financial roots.      For example, on July 14, the ag economists at the University of Illinois’ farmdocDAILY published an eye-popping report on how our toxic omelet of declining crop insurance benefits, terrible export policy, and Covid-19 has smashed Illinois farm income.      According to Illinois farm records, “Overall, incomes averaged $189,000 per farm per year for the years 2006 to 2013. From 2014 to 2019, incomes… [were] $100,000 less per farm, with a $78,000 yearly average.”      But now, “trade disputes”—a phrase that softens our woodenheaded tariff fights with key American ag customers—and a continuation of ever- declining crop insurance coverage, 2020 farm income pre-Covid is projected at a puny $44,330.      Post-Covid 2020 farm income is worse: a knee-buckling, negative $25,033.      That estimate, the economists quickly add, “does not include other forms of assistance… [including] additional Federal aid currently being discussed in Congress…”      True, but “More worrisome is 2021, which likely will have lower levels of Federal aid. Given recent setbacks in Coronavirus control, it seems reasonable [that]… 2021 could be a very low-income year for Illinois grain farmers.”      Not everyone in American ag, however, is getting plucked. Take the chicken kings, for example.      On late Friday, July 17, USDA’s “Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) announced its approval of a petition filed by the National Chicken Council,” reported Food & Water Watch, “to permit chicken that is infected with the avian disease Leukosis to be fit for human consumption.”      Prior to the rule change, chicken “carcasses found to have this disease were to be condemned and removed from further processing.”      Who, other than the owners and shareholders of chicken processors, thinks allowing formerly condemned chicken carcasses into the American and export food chains is a good idea anytime let alone during a global pandemic?       But it’s doubtful many will ever know because that day FSIS also approved an industry request to increase chicken kill line speeds from “140 birds per minute to 175 birds.”      At three birds per second, it’s hard to “inspect” any chicken for the right number of body parts, let alone for Leukosis, “a tumor-causing (neoplastic) viral infection of young chickens.”      But hey, as awful but lawful as the FSIS’s actions are, in 18 to 24 months we should develop herd immunity to any new pathogen we’re dining on, right?      Well, some of us anyway. 

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Hi – I'm reading "Food Fix: How to Save Our Health, Our Economy, Our Communities, and Our Planet--One Bite at a Time" by Mark Hyman M.D. and wanted to share this quote with you.

"When I was in medical school, I thought science was a beautiful, pristine field full of integrity and truth. But as I’ve paid closer attention, I’ve discovered that nutrition studies are highly corrupted by the food industry. Big Food is furiously promoting false science. The food industry also buys loyalty from a wide range of prominent organizations we believe to be credible and independent sources of advice. Industry spends billions on corporate social responsibility programs that make strange bedfellows, but that spending achieves two important objectives for the food industry: It can generate outspoken support, and it can buy silence. But most important, it can trick and deceive you, the consumer. After all, the industry’s ultimate goal is to get you to buy more of their products. Follow along, but be warned: What you’re about to read will shock you."

 

"The “research” contracts allow Coca-Cola to review research prior to publication and maintain control over study data, whether the study gets published, and any acknowledgment of Coca-Cola’s funding of the study. If they don’t like the results, Coke gets to bury the findings. And they support front groups that pose as independent organizations to mislead consumers. How is that real science? So much for the purity of science and independent researchers! Big Food’s ironclad plan to fool you with junk science and bogus claims is once again reminiscent of the tobacco industry’s efforts to subvert the truth in past decades. The many ways in which Big Food is borrowing the tactics of Big Tobacco were documented in a landmark 2008 paper written by Kelly Brownell, which was titled The Perils of Ignoring History: Big Tobacco Played Dirty and Millions Died. How Similar Is Big Food? As Brownell noted, “Disputing science has been a key strategy of many industries, including tobacco. Beginning with denials that smoking causes lung cancer and progressing to attacks on studies of secondhand smoke, the industry instilled doubt. Likewise, groups and scientists funded by the food industry have disputed whether the prevalence figures for obesity are correct, whether obesity causes disease, and whether foods like soft drinks cause harm.”"

Start reading this book for free: https://a.co/bOTKrbo

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Start reading this book for free: https://a.co/fDFaJkH



THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 7/19/2020 10:37pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Wow.  Never again will there be two different ground beef pickups done at the same time.  The one and half pound processors number were close.  They were in plastic bags and impossible to count ahead of the pickup.  The other processor gave me totals mid week and I based the pickup on those numbers, and it appeared there was enough for all on the list with about 50 pounds extra.  When we picked up the one pounders, I was inside buying some bacon and wursts.  As I was leaving I asked again how many pounds I had.  That number didn't match and instead of counting the number of boxes, I had Dallas recalculate by reducing some of the larger amounts.   After explaining the discrepancy to the first several customers, we looked at the remaining boxes and discovered there would have been almost enough, given that I thought I had an extra 50 pounds.  Bottom line, they told me the wrong amount when we picked up.  Sorry for the confusion that morning!
  • A new list has started and there may be another this fall.  It will depend on processor availability.  Processors are still under water with work.
  • Last week was animal week on the hill.  The guinea pair setting outside finally hatched out their brood.  Not sure how many.  They are so small and quick.  The pair have been great parents, going slowly and occasionally looking back to make sure the stragglers were keeping up.  I think we have lost a couple but the parents have quite a task ahead.  Found  a black snake in the hen nests.  Had to eliminate it.  I was gone to Holden to get chicken feed and I got a call from Debra.  There's a critter near the bee hive.  "I can't tell what it is.  I've never seen such an animal".   Turns out it was a badger.  I haven't seen one of those for several years.
  • Peaches were a bust.  And we lost  a peach and a plum tree.  Blackberries have been good.  We had a cobbler today and it was really good.
  • Last week we processed the fifteen fryers Debra raised.  It's a job.  Sure glad we only had fifteen.
  • It's dry and we missed a good rain this afternoon just to our south.

**********************************************************************  (a customer responded last week

Awesome reading Art.. it would be nice for the majority to realize and start implementing these direly needed truths... care properly for the planet and reap the much needed resources. Unfortunately human nature at the top tier is to wait for a crisis before taking action. Best for your week ahead!

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Want to know the difference between grass finished and grass fed????

https://youtu.be/70SUKkUaMo4

 

https://youtu.be/5ypbjAldKCc

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Watch "Grass Fed Beef - Everything You Need To Know And Where To Buy It" https://youtu.be/aF8ANzbtzTQ

 




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 6/21/2020 10:07pm by Art Ozias.
             BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • We have been delivering beef.  This week we should finish and be caught up.  We have some scheduled processing dates in November.  We have some ready now but processors are still booked through next year.  I'm hoping for a cancellation.  

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“Mr. Ozias, I used that tenderizer tonight on some steaks (also used kosher salt and sat in the fridge for a few hours) which I pan seared in avocado oil until they reached 130 internal temp, then rested them with a smidgen of avocado butter and those steaks were the greatest ever.  Those steaks had an amazing taste and texture, in a completely different league than the steaks at hyvee or price chopper.

Thanks Spencer.


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Iowa has lost about half the topsoil it had in 1850. Since they were first plowed, America’s farmland soils have lost about half of their organic matter–the dark, spongy decomposed plant and animal tissue that helps make them fertile.

The soil that produces our nation’s food supply is a weakened link slowly failing under ongoing strain. This breakdown isn’t as dramatic as what happened in the 1930s during the Dust Bowl, but it is just as worrying. Human history holds many examples of once-thriving agricultural regions around the world where failure to maintain soil health degraded entire regions far below their potential agricultural productivity, impoverishing the descendants of those who wrecked their land.

https://civileats.com/2020/06/12/op-ed-its-time-to-rethink-the-food-system-from-the-ground-up/

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INTERVIEW: SUPPORTING THE SOIL CARBON SPONGE

Microbiologist, climate scientist and founder of Healthy Soils Australia Walter Jehne discusses climate and soil health.

 

This is an excellent interview and I encourage everyone to read it.

 

https://www.ecofarmingdaily.com/supporting-the-soil-carbon-sponge/?utm_source=Acres+U.S.A.+Community&utm_campaign=627bad9d6b-Keep+Learning+Coronavirus+3-20-20&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65283346c2-627bad9d6b-167799457&goal=0_65283346c2-627bad9d6b-167799457&mc_cid=627bad9d6b&mc_eid=9b38c085f3

 

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Mini radios will help scientists study monarch butterfly migration Be sure to read this. It's fascinating.

https://www.post-gazette.com/news/science/2020/05/04/monarch-butterflies-migration-Pittsburgh-Pennsyl vania-tracking-Carnegie-Motus-transmitter/stories/202005040022

 

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Watch "Vitamin K2 and Pathological Calcification" on YouTube https://youtu.be/GvW7iBvPuDM

 




THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com

Posted 6/2/2020 10:09pm by Art Ozias.

            BREEZY HILL FARM WEEKLY UPDATE

  • Sophie ( our Great Pyrenees) got a hair cut today.  The temperatures are increasing and with her heavy hair coat she gets overheated.  We will save those bags of hair for next year for the Baltimore Orioles.  I'm guessing they will like it for nest building just as well as horse hair.
  • We are going to have a huge seed bank in our pastures this year.  This spring has been great for grasses in our pastures.  Now all those seed heads will fall to the soil and will be there for years to come.  Some will germinate next year and some will be there for several years until conditions are right.
  • Our guineas are not behaving as in past years.  Several hens have been setting on a bunch of eggs and last week they started hatching baby keets.  Except this time just one at a time.  Each day we find one more hatched.   Usually, they all come in a day or two.  We found a hidden nest while doing some weed eating, so there may be more.  I've got to build some more nests for inside their house for next year.
  • Strawberries are in peak production.  Just had a bowl on some ice cream.  So much better than Dairy Queen.
  • I found some great Dirt Hogs and have one for July and five for August.  These are all spoken for.  There may be some more this fall, but will depend on whether we can find a processor that has an opening.  Their schedules are still full.

 

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What is going on here? Thanks for 60 Minutes. Is there a swamp? Yes, watch this. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/most-trade-war-relief-aid-bypassed-small-medium-farms-60-minutes-2020-05-03/



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The meat we eat is a pandemic risk, too

For years, expert bodies like the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been warning that most emerging infectious diseases come from animals and that our industrialized farming practices are ratcheting up the risk. “Livestock health is the weakest link in our global health chain,” noted the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in a 2013 report.



https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2020/4/22/21228158/coronavirus-pandemic-risk-factory-farming-meat

 

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Here is a must SEE video. https://www.instagram.com/tv/CAym4n8namq/?igshid=iw8tqgfbsvdw

 

 

THAT'S IT FROM THE HILL FOR THIS WEEK.  ART AND DEBRA

"BE HEALTHY, EAT GRASS"

Art Ozias

(aozias@gmail.com)

www.breezy-hill-farm.com